Do I Need a Retaining Wall?

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Old 03-01-14, 08:04 AM
J
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Do I Need a Retaining Wall?

Hello, I am planning on replacing my backyard chain link fence with a wood privacy fence and as you can see in the pictures, the fence runs along drainage ditch and my yard has a pretty steep slope just inside of the current fence line. As a result of the slope and water drainage/erosion a lot of dirt & debris has accumulated inside the fence and is being held up by the fence.

I was hoping this would be a simple fence replacement project but I want to do things right, so do I need to put in some kind of retaining wall here?

http://img857.imageshack.us/img857/5...0325131425.jpg
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/9...0325131003.jpg
http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/5...131104copy.jpg
http://s30.postimg.org/hlmyntgy9/photo_3.jpg

I'm thinking about building the new fence in about a foot or two starting where the ground begins to drop steeply. This will give us more privacy and would save money on skipping a retaining wall, at a cost of losing 2 foot or so off the side of our yard. Any thoughts?
 

Last edited by jimmyrules712; 03-01-14 at 09:37 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-01-14, 06:27 PM
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The retaining wall looks okay to me. I wouldn't touch it & I wouldn't move the fence away from your property line either. That could cause what a lawyer would call "adverse possession" The only reason I know that is because we did a fence job for a lawyer.
 
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Old 03-01-14, 07:50 PM
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I think you misunderstood my question. I'm not talking about changing the existing concrete creek. The drainage creek is city property. I'm talking about building a retaining wall at the edge of the ditch to raise my yard's height.

Since the drainage ditch is the divider between my property and my neighbors I don't think it matters where I put my fence. My neighbor isn't going to try to claim 2 feet of dirt on the other side of the city-owned creek.
 
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Old 03-02-14, 10:25 AM
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If you raise the height of your yard, it could send the water towards your house. You don't want that.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 01:15 PM
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Quick update:
I just got done removing the old fence and clearing all the debris that the fence was holding up. In some spots the fence was holding up over 1 foot of dirt.

I really think some kind of retaining wall is needed. But what? Or should I just regrade the lawn so it gradually slopes down to the creek?

Here's some updated pictures of what it now looks like.





 
  #6  
Old 03-26-14, 01:43 PM
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Wall

Build the retaining wall.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 03:35 PM
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I concur with wirepuller.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 06:50 PM
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Before you start building the wall, it wouldn't hurt to talk to the City, regarding any set-back or easement requirements for their concrete drainage feature. Some local governments can be pretty persnickety about encroaching on their property. You won't be happy if they say your newly-finished wall is too close to their ditch concrete, and has to be removed and rebuilt a few feet farther away.
 
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