What is the Least Expensive way to fix these steps/sidewalk ?

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Old 03-04-14, 11:13 AM
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Question What is the Least Expensive way to fix these steps/sidewalk ?

We plan to move from our home in a year or two and are in the process of preparing it to sell.

I need to know the least expensive way to fix our damaged front steps and sidewalk.

Here's pics.

Concrete - a set on Flickr


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Thank you
 
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Old 03-04-14, 01:28 PM
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Steps and Walk Way

New concrete all the way.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 02:59 PM
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Amen to that, Wirepuller. Remove and replace is the only "fix" for what's shown in the pix. Attempting to cover things with a cheap surface coating will only tend to scare away potential buyers, making them wonder what else has been hidden. Many of the cracks appear to be working, meaning even an exterior ceramic tile application wouldn't be practical, as reflective cracks will start breaking tiles and grout lines.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 03:27 PM
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It looks like someone already tried the least expensive way so you already know the answer to that question. Do you mean the 2nd least expensive way?

That is the kind of thing where if you aren't willing to put up the cash to just have that re-done, you leave it as-is and accept that the buyer may factor the cost of a fix into the haggling process. You now have a hack fix that shoppers will zero in on when they pull up at the curb, causing them to wonder what caliber of work went into other things in the house.

There was someone else bouncing back and fourth between diychatroom and here very recently who was looking for advice on this exact same sort of repair because of 'curb appeal' concerns. They were told repeatedly that any kind of diy patch work would look worse and draw more attention to it than if it were left unaddressed, but last I checked they were still arguing the point.
 

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Old 03-04-14, 11:06 PM
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Thanks for the input.

What could I expect to pay (BALLPARK) to replace the steps and the sidewalk area in between them ?
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:01 AM
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I suspect in the neighborhood of several, or even three, thousand $$$. But that's just a pure guess, as I don't have a feel for prices and material costs where you live. Call a few contractors for estimates.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 08:55 AM
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I gonna put myself out on a limb but with demo and tipping fees, remove old base and replace with compacted base, drainage (that what looked like what happened), replace concrete steps and sidewalk you are looking at about $30 to #50 dollars per sq.ft. You may want to consider a loss on what your asking price then to go through the reconstruction of your sidewalks and steps. If you try and do it on the cheap, it may come back to haunt you.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 09:04 AM
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Thank you for your input landfillwizard. Much appreciated.

Is this a job a DIY'er with moderate skills could reasonably do ?

How much could I expect to save if I do the demolition and debris removal myself. Then have a Contractor come in and do the Prep, pour and finishing work ?

BTW, the pictures posted are a bit dated. Those light grey patch lines have faded/worn and actually looks like this now.

-->>> Concrete - a set on Flickr

The attached pic is an older pic of the front of my house. The standing soldier brick wall has been replaced with a grey stone wall. Believe it or not, a drunk driver landed up in our flower bed and over the front steps in his Crown Victoria!

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.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 09:36 AM
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Red face

Here's pics from when the drunk driver hit our wall a few years ago.

I'm not sure what you (the Public) can see on my photo hosting sites. Could someone tell me which one works or doesn't ?

Drunk Driver Hits our Wall album | Labrat0116 | Fotki.com, photo and video sharing made easy.

Here's another site if the one above doesn't work for you.

Drunk Driver Hits our Wall - a set on Flickr
 

Last edited by Katmandu; 03-05-14 at 10:18 AM.
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Old 03-05-14, 11:48 AM
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"Water, taken in moderation, never hurt anyone." At least that's what Mark Twain wrote, many years ago. Guess your nocturnal landscaping help was drinking something considerably stronger than water.

The answer to your question regarding whether a DIYer with "moderate skills" could perform the job depends on how many of those skills were acquired doing concrete work. If you've never batched, placed and finished concrete, then I don't think you should consider tackling this job. Too many unknowns to take on, many of which could result in a mess. To the extent of having to rip things out and start over. Especially the steps, as they are a lot more complicated (to properly form, place and finish) than ordinary flatwork.

Regarding the demolition and removals, you'd probably save up to $500 or so. Especially since the condition of much of the concrete appears as if it's on the verge of being ready to pick up and haul away. Wouldn't require a demolition hammer rental, just a decent 10-lb. maul and a wheel barrow.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:57 PM
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The dates on the photos are very interesting. 2006 for the pretty colorful one with more vegetation, nicely coated walk and an aged brick wall, while the 2010 one shows the vegetation removed, the wall replaced and the current (2010) patched walk. - Were the dates wrong?

Dick
 
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Old 03-05-14, 01:09 PM
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Dick....
It makes sense to me. 2006...was probably a move in pic (maybe?). DD messed it up in 2007 (check the Flickr link). 2010 is latest shots.

Lots of people dig out plantings because of maintenance issues.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 01:40 PM
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My comments were on the dated photos that have showed some additional deterioration a showing it is really a long term problem that can be resolved by removal. A quick patch/coating job runs the risk of entering into a price negotiation. If that is OK with the seller, he can expect some tough negotiating to get a quick sale.

It is a matter on the difference in the net price in the end. There are many ways to create a positive impression, which is the prime rule (outside of location) to make a smooth sale and new patch work will also be noticed (for good or bad). I have been involved in sales for outstanding properties where they looked too good and new. New/replacement work would be a positive, especially it does not look too recent, but a matter of proper maintenance.

I would make sure to put the flag out when it goes on the market and do as much as possible to make it like the area before the crash. Just hope a buyer does not look at the old and new photos.

Dick
 
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Old 03-05-14, 02:18 PM
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Ok...gotcha.

Personally...with the look of that house...depending on interior/exterior condition of course...I think it would sell quickly even with the messed up walk. If the seller is willing to lower the price to cover the replacement...I might feel better as a buyer knowing I would oversee the work. Of course...as a buyer...I also might not have the money to get it fixed unless I received money at closing.

Much depends on market and location.

OMG...I just realized the OPs location. I grew up about 10 miles from there! Bought the suit I got married in (2nd time) downtown.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 12:04 AM
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Thanks again for the inputs. Very insightful and helpful.

The dates are correct actually. The drunk driver destroyed the old standing soldier brick wall and a lot of the vegetation. Boy my wife was pissed! IIRC (back in 2010, we actually moved into another property we bought and "tried" to sell this house. We removed some dead vegatation (drought around here back then) and replaced some of it and replaced it with mulch. We ended up just moving back into this house 2 years ago and renting out the other house.

The vegetation looks much better now than that 2010 pic.

Bit of subject but a very interesting story. This house does have a very interesting history connected to the Great Flood of the Dayton area back in 1913! The Dayton Art Institute had an Exhibit last year about it. Extremely fascinating. As my wife and I were touring the exhibit, my wife was about a head of me looking at Before and After pics of some local areas. All the sudden I hear her say.... Uh...Eric ! That's OUR HOUSE! I turned and looked and sure enough, there were (2) pics (before/after) of our house on the wall! To say we were stunned is an understatement!

Check out the Before (1913) and After (2013) pics a Professional photographer took of our house and had on display!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/6115635...7638533810474/

Probably not a real good selling point, but we were told our street was under 8 FEET of water during this flood! The 8 foot level is almost to the roof of our front porch!

Also, the front sidewalk (parallel to the street) was replaced about 7 years ago....a month before that drunk driver took a drive into the flower bed. IIRC, we paid around $1500 or so to have it redone.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 12:14 AM
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Personally...with the look of that house...depending on interior/exterior condition of course...I think it would sell quickly even with the messed up walk. If the seller is willing to lower the price to cover the replacement...I might feel better as a buyer knowing I would oversee the work. Of course...as a buyer...I also might not have the money to get it fixed unless I received money at closing.
Overall the house is in VGC, with all modern updates performed. Double-paned windows, 100 amp circuit breakers, Pex tube plumbing, Central A/C, New furnance and water heater last year.

Good point about "maybe" not fixing the steps/walk and lowering the price some. I'll run that past our Realtor as well.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 12:17 AM
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OMG...I just realized the OPs location. I grew up about 10 miles from there!
Piqua ? Vandalia ? Huber ?

BTW Vic, thank you for your service in the Navy! I'm Retired USAF myself. I work at the Dayton VA now.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 12:23 AM
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Just remember about that drunk driver. He actually lived in that yellow apartment building next door to us. He had been extremely depressed and troubled person. He was on his way back from a local bar and "TRIED" to commit suicide by hitting that telephone pole in front of our house! All he got was some bumps and bruises.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 05:51 AM
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Another 2nd best solutuion short of replacing everything. Using a chisle dig out those cracks and broken pieces. Try to go at least 3 inches deep if possible. Over dig by at least 2 to 3 inches wider than the cracks. Then mix new cement (you might want to use TOP and BOND red lable or hydraulic cement like Fast Plug.) and patch. This is not an ideal solution but it will make it look better and safer for at least several years to come. Careful mixing of patch medium can come close to matching existing color.
 
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Old 03-06-14, 10:55 AM
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Another 2nd best solutuion short of replacing everything. Using a chisle dig out those cracks and broken pieces. Try to go at least 3 inches deep if possible. Over dig by at least 2 to 3 inches wider than the cracks. Then mix new cement (you might want to use TOP and BOND red lable or hydraulic cement like Fast Plug.) and patch. This is not an ideal solution but it will make it look better and safer for at least several years to come. Careful mixing of patch medium can come close to matching existing color.
I would consider doing this.

I'm not familiar with the Top and Bond red label. Is that a coating for the whole surface ?
 
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Old 03-06-14, 11:47 AM
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Yes and no. Made by Sakrete or is it Quickrete? IDK.

Anyway, that's how I use it as a finishing coat on my garage floor when the salt has had its way after several years. But it can be used as a full repair in deep crevasses and patch work. If you open the holes large enough then regular cement can be used. It won't hold up as long. The Top & Bond has fibers in it to help give it strength. I've used it outside also and it holds up pretty well. You could the Fast Plug hydraulic stuff. Again its not a permanent fix, but it should get you buy for a couple years.
 
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