Concrete chipping away at front edge of garage floor

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Old 03-11-14, 04:44 PM
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Concrete chipping away at front edge of garage floor

Our 20 yr old home has had an ongoing problem with bits and pieces of the garage floor chipping/breaking (where the floor meets the driveway, under the garage door weatherstrip). I took out the broken stuff and filled with sand, then covered with patching cement and that was OK for a year or so, but will be time to take action again.
I am considering having and expert cut out this whole strip (side to side) and repour the section. Just thought maybe there was another way to go about it, doing these small areas doesn't seem to last and we'd like a more permanant/professional repair. I can post pics if it would help.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 01:45 AM
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pictures are nice especially when a poster wants 1/2way decent advise conc driveway ?
 
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Old 03-12-14, 02:01 AM
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Thaks, I will get some pics up later today, yeah you're right, just bein lazy.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 01:38 PM
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OK here are the pics, bear in mind I did repair this once, so the affected areas are now the patching cement, not the original. Looked pretty much the same before I repaired it the first time.
Don't have a problem calling in an expert (saw, jackhammer, cement truck, etc0 if that's what it takes. Just looking for opinions.
The first pic is a bit to the right of where my pickups tires enter the garage, the second pic you can sort of see tire tracks from my wifes car, so this area is about in the middle of where her tires are, so I don't think it's caused by tires, may just be freeze/thaw related?
 
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Old 03-12-14, 10:54 PM
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I spent almost 8 years of my professional DOT career working with concrete problems in Wisconsin. I see a lot of chert pop-outs in your garage floor, and an indication that the overall concrete quality was possibly a bit low in cement content and has too much fine aggregate (not enough rock). It shows up in the wheel paths for obvious reasons, evolving into "D"-shaped spalling as yours is doing. A proper fix would include making a sawcut several inches deep parallel to the door and expansion joint filler, but at least 8" or 9" back from the joint. Doing so will put the new junction between new and existing well inside the garage, instead of outside where it's exposed to the elements. Go down at least 3" with complete removal, using small chipping hammers to take everything out. Go much shallower (like your first repair appears to be), and you'll be doing it all again in a few years. Sand-blast to squeaky-clean condition, followed by first wetting and then applying a neat Portland cement slurry bonding agent, before immediately applying your new concrete. Don't drive on it for at least 4 or 5 days.

There isn't enough quantity to warrant using commercial ready-mix, far less than a yard, so just batch your own using a quality sack-mix, possibly sweetened with some additional Portland cement in each batch.
 
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Old 03-13-14, 02:05 AM
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Thanks much, that's pretty much what I had assumed I had to do, appreciate the explaination. Yes I didn't remove very much at all, just what I cold pick out and maybe chiseled a few pieces out that looked suspect.
There is some construction going on here again, I had a little work done before at the driveway apron where a concreete company said they would have some extra concrete on a truck in the area they could have available, maybe that could happen again.
 
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Old 03-14-14, 08:24 AM
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The only thing I would add to Bridgeman's comments is to make sure the material you use is a sidewalk mix with entrained air. The entrained air makes the concrete more durable in cold weather. Also if you get the material off a truck, see how long the material had been batched. If it is longer that 90 minutes there may be problems. there are more problems that may occur if the concrete has been batched longer than 90 minutes. Also if the slump is less than 2" don't add anymore water! This will weaken the compressive strength of the concrete.
 
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Old 03-14-14, 02:00 PM
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Just some clarification regarding the previous post: If the slump is much less than 2", you will have definite problems in getting it to flow down the chute. Adding a few gallons of water to a small, partial load left in a mixer truck, should not weaken the mix appreciably.
 
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