cracks in cement around foundation

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Old 04-01-14, 09:54 AM
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cracks in cement around foundation

Hi all, thanks in advance for your input. To add a little narrative to the attached photo (although i don't think much is really needed): the concrete slab-type "walkway" shown here has obviously been moving around a bit. I only moved into this place a few months ago, so not sure when it all started. in any case, the slab in the foreground is visibly pitched toward the house. I've already patched the crease along the foundation, as well as the large crack running the length of the "walkway" with quikrete hydraulic cement (Quikrete 20 lb. Hydraulic Water-Stop Cement-112620 at The Home Depot) but that patch-up is slowly crumbling away. I'm here to ask for advice on how to best remedy the situation. I've thought about renting a jackhammer, destroying the existing "walkway", and pouring a new one. that's about as broad-stroke an idea as i can imagine...not sure what the step-by-step process for that would involve. Or, perhaps someone may recommend just using some product right on top of the existing. the back yard is not at all a showpiece, so i have no issue digging into the ground that's adjacent to the walkway.

before the quikrete patches, water would come into the basement right there during rain. the patch actually helped a lot, but would like something a little more serious, i guess... i'll probably need to apply something to the foundation 'crease' all around the house (is there a formal name for that crease? ...like where the horizontal surface of the walkway meets the vertical surface of the foundation?)

Thanks again for your time and advice. Happy to hear any and all suggestions!
 
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Old 04-01-14, 11:04 AM
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Bad call to put a cement-type product in that crack. It will not expand and contract with the movement of the foundation and the ground next to it, so that's why it crumbled. A masonry caulk or construction sealant of some sort that has some flexibility to it would be a better bet. Mosey on down the sealant aisle at your local big box store when you have time and you should find plenty of options. But that's more of a last line of defense for wind-driven rain and water that gets to that area, and should be coupled with a good slope away from the house. Caulk was not designed to protect against significant direct water intrusion all by itself in any application. If the walkway slopes towards the house the water will keep trying to find a way in, meaning even a caulk or a sealant will have to be maintained and re-applied.

Rip and replace is the permanent solution. That or put a drain there.
 
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Old 04-01-14, 04:12 PM
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Ditto to what eharri3 said. The condition of your walkway appears that it's ready for replacement, and a new one can be properly pitched to drain completely away from the foundation. Joint filler by itself won't be 100% water-proof, so you may still want to install a good, commercial-grade sealant on top of it (leaving it at least 3/4" below grade).

If there was nothing in the gap there, your "foundation crease" is usually called a joint opening. Often preformed joint fillers are installed to serve as a cushion between concrete and foundation wall, but they tend to weather and deteriorate over time. If you've never done concrete work before, you have a challenge ahead of you.
 
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Old 04-05-14, 06:30 AM
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thanks, guys.

$850 to overlay with 4000psi concrete sound like a good deal? price includes 1 yard of concrete and reinforcement. guessing the concrete itself is probably only about $100...is this not something that might fall in the diy category?
 
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Old 04-05-14, 06:36 AM
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OR, $400 for these guys (Consolidated Concrete - Home) to come over with a truck and dump up to 2 yards of 6000psi concrete for me to finish.
 
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Old 04-05-14, 08:56 AM
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A bonded concrete overlay will be problematic down at the street, where you have to match the grade of sidewalk that's already there. I don't think you (or your city) will want a permanent, 2" tripping hazard there. And trying to "feather-edge" the overlay isn't likely to work either.
 
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Old 04-05-14, 10:12 AM
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Yeah I don't know why you would want to "overlay" that mess. Tear the old out, use the opportunity to regrade the area, form the new up and place new back in. Concrete price will be the same. The only extra labor is the tearout. New sidewalk should be about the easiest DIY there is.
 
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