how I measure that slabs have appropriate support area on a wall.

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Old 04-03-14, 10:25 AM
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how I measure that slabs have appropriate support area on a wall.

Hello,

My house has 2 layers. I would like to check that reinforced concrete slabs (4m long) don't have a lack of support on the brick walls. It's not obvious to get even close to the joint between slabs and walls.
Might be some ultrasonic measurement instrument could do it? Might be I could inspect it from upper floor.

many thanks,
alexander
 
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Old 04-03-14, 11:17 AM
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You might have luck with a remote camera. In North America remote inspection cameras are relatively inexpensive and are a great way for seeing into tight places and around corners. Baring that I think get into some very expensive inspection techniques like X-ray to peer through the walls. There are also devices used to detect broken wires underground that might be able to tell the length of rebar or find the end of the rods but I would go for the camera first.

 
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Old 04-03-14, 12:46 PM
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could you suggest an inspection device for concrete slabs

thank you for help! I'm not very advanced in such technology and surely could save a lot of time if you suggest few reliable devices for concrete. I think max range about 50cm will be enough. Basically the idea is to get an estimate measure from upper floor, by looking down through the slab on its area laying on the wall.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 11:14 PM
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Why is it important that you know this? Is the house showing signs of distress? Or are you just curious, and want to know to help you sleep better at night?

Do some digging, and find the original construction plans for the place. They will show the dimension that you seek. If not available, then find out what the standard practice was when the place was being built. Even talking to some old-timers (building people) might help with finding an answer.
 
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Old 04-04-14, 12:57 AM
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I've found for a bathroom that actually 3m slabs are lying only on 3cm from both sides of the wall. Well, then you look into documentation/plan you read 7cm. I asked local bricklayers to construct second/inner wall. But I dont think It was a good idea.
Now I puzzle myself with questions about all other slabs. How much support slabs have. Is it really the same as in documentation. Yes. it's my concern.
 
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Old 04-04-14, 07:52 AM
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In Central America drawings and inspections are almost useless. The quality of constructions comes down to the builder, their knowledge and desire to build a strong, safe home. I find it helpful to find out who built a house and then see some of their projects currently under construction and see how they actually build.
 
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Old 04-04-14, 08:30 AM
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Hello,

Even if you build by yourself you hand over the real work to different companies. And you can't see by your own eyes how it was built actually.
if you find something wrong it's natural to dig more and in case of a problem to consider different solutions. in practice, one finds a company to do the work.

That's the reason why I would like to inspect it at first and then talk to professionals if needed.
The question is what device is appropriate to get a good estimate. I'm not after 3D HD pictures, useless, obviously.
 
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Old 04-04-14, 10:56 AM
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efremov -

Exactly where is the structure? What type of structure? - You mention looking down from above.

Exactly what is the wall construction cross-section as far as you understand? - Multiple layers of brick or other materials?

Is the reinforced concrete cast is place or precast elsewhere?

It sounds like some Brazilian/Brasilian construction where the concrete slabs are cast in place and are actually a part of the wall (very good and strong construction). In Europe, there some unique concrete systems with fine details and also very stable for decades. - As an example, I have seen 20 story building using 6" (150 mm) concrete block with no steel or concrete columns that meet most international codes and standards. - They are far ahead of the U.S. methods (they essentially use U.S. standards, but they use them better).

Dick
 
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Old 04-04-14, 12:15 PM
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In Europe you can find almost everything. I know personally guy who has bought a house with broken foundation (how he could know). The cost of repair equals the cost of new building. He left the house and moved away. we often think the other countries do better than we do.

1. Exactly where is the structure? What type of structure? It's 2-story house.
It's difficult to get close to the joint because of suspended ceiling. Barring the case of disassembling the ceiling, do measurements, rebuild ceiling, refinish it. There is an option to look at the join from upper story. But in that case there is additional layer of concrete above the slabs(5-7cm), then slab itself (20-25cm I guess).

2. Exactly what is the wall construction cross-section as far as you understand? Traditional fired red clay brick, factory made. In documentation distance between edge of the slab and edge of the wall is 7cm. There are anchors that bind slabs to the walls on both sides.

3. Is the reinforced concrete cast is place or precast elsewhere? It's factory made 4m long, 1.2m wide. except for bathroom, 3m slabs were used.

Looking for device if there is any. I'm not sure at all.
 

Last edited by efremov; 04-04-14 at 02:26 PM.
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