Cement truck on asphalt driveway

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Old 04-09-14, 01:45 PM
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Cement truck on asphalt driveway

I need to get cement poured in my backyard. Is it ok to have the cement truck come on to my asphalt driveway. I am not sure how think the driveway is so I know that wont help much. Last summer I had a 10yard dumpster filled with dirt and old pavers in the driveway and everything was good.

The readymix company said the truck is about 24-25 tons with the cement.
 
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Old 04-09-14, 02:28 PM
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In the wheel path area, put down a few sheets of thick CDX plywood. And don't wait for the hottest day of the year for your delivery--cooler is always better when it comes to avoiding excessive asphalt deflection on residential driveways.
 
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Old 04-09-14, 03:30 PM
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Bridgeman had good advice. I will add that you want to do it when you have had a stretch of dry weather. If the ground is saturated under the asphalt, there is a lot more potential for it to sink under a heavy load. Your asphalt will be no match for that weight without a very stable base under it.
Most ready mix companies will require you to sign a waiver before pulling a truck on your driveway. That way, they are not liable for damage.
 
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Old 04-10-14, 04:57 AM
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Most cement companies have extension tubes or troughs just for this type of situation wher the truck can't get close to the drop site.
 
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Old 04-10-14, 05:05 AM
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Don't know the cost [doubt it's cheap] but a pumper is also an option.
 
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Old 04-10-14, 05:26 AM
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How much cement are you getting?

My cement companies limit their trucks to using only four chute extensions which often is not enough even when they can back right up to the pour site. A pump is a great option though the most expensive and it sometimes requires a different mix of concrete. You can also get some strong guys and wheel barrows.
 
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Old 04-10-14, 09:11 AM
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Last time I rented a concrete ground pump, it cost $500 for a half day, with operator. That was in Albuquerque, in 1991--I doubt prices have gone down much since then. Truck-mounted pumps will run at least $300 an hour, with operator.

Two or three healthy guys and wheelbarrows could easily handle the job, and would only cost a few 6-packs of their favorite malt beverage--only after the job is done, of course.
 
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Old 04-10-14, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by BridgeMan45

In the wheel path area, put down a few sheets of thick CDX plywood.
And don't wait for the hottest day of the year for your delivery--
cooler is always better when it comes to avoiding excessive asphalt deflection on residential driveways.
I highly agree about the plywood, might even suggest 2 staggered layers.

However, I'm not so sure about the weather.

If you're in an area with clay soils that turn to mush in spring,
they I'd actually lean towards a delivery in summer,
when the ground beneath the black top is rock hard.






- depending on your soil type,
 
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Old 04-10-14, 11:22 AM
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Heck, we still have a foot of snow in the yard and plenty of frost below that so not sure where you are in NY but may still be a bit early. Given the weight of a concrete truck it is very difficult to avoid some damage so if they back in, use lots of plywood as suggested. Also, check the availability and cost of renting a power buggy. They would be easier and faster than wheel barrows.

How much concrete, for what, and how many helpers.

Bud
 
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Old 04-18-14, 10:56 AM
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I'm a dispatcher for a ready mix company here in SE Tennessee. I get these questions all the time. It sounds like all your options have been covered.

The best being a 2" line pump. The pump and concrete truck would sit at the road and never hurt anything. A pump would probably be the most expensive.

Wheelbarrows would be safe too, also probably the cheapest probably.

But if it was me, and you aren't getting more than a couple yards, I would just back it up over top of it and not worry. We haul 6-8yd on asphalt driveways all the time with very little issues. But if you happened to have some extra plywood laying around it wouldn't hurt to throw it down under the tires. Just keep in mind an empty truck weighs about 30,000lbs, and 1yd of concrete weighs about 3,800-4,000lbs lbs.
 
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