Problem with new concrete driveway (pic included)

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  #1  
Old 04-24-14, 04:21 PM
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Problem with new concrete driveway (pic included)

This is my new driveway, just poured a few days ago. Today, I noticed this gap under the concrete. It is only about a few inches deep (see pic) but it concerns me. My concrete guy says that the backfill will eventually harden and close the gap but I am unsure. Can someone give me advice on how to fix this issue? Choosing the wrong contractor sure does cause stress. I appreciate any advice you may have.
 
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Last edited by hstanfield; 04-24-14 at 05:51 PM. Reason: no replies
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Old 04-25-14, 08:06 AM
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From What I can see is that the base material was not compacted before the concrete was poured. If that is the case you may have cracking from settlement in the future.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 09:35 AM
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You don't have many options at this point. You can put some fill dirt along the concrete and try packing it up underneath the concrete to fill the voids. Then back fill up to the level of the concrete's surface to help prevent erosion underneath the concrete.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 02:40 PM
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i think dane's got it right,,, by the time you back up the edges, doubt you'll have a problem,,, the base mtl doesn't look the greatest as its mostly crushed stone - i don't see much in there that's compactible,,, sometimes very difficult to use a plate compactor on rock OR sand,,, you might try piling some dirt next to the hole & bang it in w/2 x 4 & hammer THEN back up the shoulder - better yet, have your d/w dude do it BEFORE the check
 
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Old 04-25-14, 03:02 PM
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Unfortunately,I found out late in the game that this contractor was the wrong choice and in my haste to get rid of him, I gave him the check. As you said Stadry, should have not given him the money and I feel like an idiot. He did agree to come out tomorrow and "see what he can do." I am going to see what he does. If he doesn't fix it to my satisfaction, I wonder if I would have any shot at suing him over this? I had also entertained the idea of packing some thick quickrete in there..any thoughts on that?
 
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Old 04-25-14, 03:37 PM
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I can almost guarantee you won't make out suing. The contractor is due for whatever value he can show he added to your property. Bickering over quality of work will be a tough task as he can show cost of concrete & labor to install.

So, I think you are best to just have a strong beverage of your choice and live with it. It's not proper but it's not the end of the world and you may never have any cracking or problem. Compacting earth underneath will help but the bulk of work will come from the strength of the concrete once it's cured. Avoid driving heavy vehicles right to the edge for a month. Aside from that make sure you do back fill to prevent erosion that will further undermine the slab.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 05:03 PM
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Dane, thanks for the reassurance. I appreciate you taking the time to explain it to me as you did. I am going to concentrate on packing that in and maybe even plant some ground cover to help with erosion. Thanks again.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 05:34 PM
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More pics

I meant to post these earlier but may give more perspective on the area.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 05:40 PM
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You may be able to help the situation by placing -" stone along the edge and use a 2"X2" pole to "chink" the stone under the exposed area of concrete. Using washed stone will give you a french drain style along the edge of the concrete. I also wanted to ask, what is the white thing along the edge of the concrete that looks like PVC pipe?
 
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Old 04-25-14, 05:43 PM
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You [posted the pictures when I was writing a response. What is going to happen to that receptacle when you get one of the KY gully washers?
 
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Old 04-25-14, 06:04 PM
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Landfillwizard,
I have been meaning to get rid of that conduit so I need to get that gone and capped off....best way to do that??
 
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Old 04-26-14, 04:33 AM
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If you want to preserve the outlet I'd set a 4x4 or 6x6 post and put the outlet box on the side away from the driveway and get the box a foot off the ground.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 05:07 AM
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Just an opinion from the audience, but you will have a difficult time keeping that gravel in place under the edge of the concrete with that immediate slope. IMO, you need a sturdy edger of some sort to hold the fill at the same level as the concrete. Something like a pressure treated 2x6 staked into the ground about a foot away from the edge. Then compact and fill as suggested.

Just my opinion.
Bud
 
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Old 04-26-14, 05:39 AM
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understand why you thought it was needed to post in 2 forums but the rules of conc are the same all over the world probably as dependent as water running downhill

irc
 
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Old 04-26-14, 06:58 AM
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IMHO, I would shut off the circuit breaker at the panel associated with this receptacle and remove the wires where they join this circuit. Remove the conduit without damaging the wire and pull the wire back to where is exits the outside wall. I would then attach the receptacle to the side of the garage approximately 4' off the ground using some of the conduit you just removed. Cut the wire to fit the new circuit and install it to the garage. Hook the circuit back up and now you have a receptacle you can use.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 12:38 PM
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I went ahead and just removed the conduit so that it is not a concern anymore and I really don't use it that much anyway. I have a plug in the front of the house or some in the garage I can use.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 12:43 PM
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Bud,
So when you say a 2x6 staked into the ground....I may need 2 if you are meaning that it should be flat on the ground. Also, instead of a foot away, should I get it closer to hold everything in even better. I have never built a retaining wall unless it was just in a landscaping bed. Any advice on how to go about this. I have looked at some videos etc but none of them really address exactly what I need. I appreciate you opinion.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 12:49 PM
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Stadry, I know but I wanted as many opinions as possible on the matter...sorry if the 2 forums were overkill to you, lol.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 01:10 PM
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I was thinking on edge even if you have to remove a little soil to get it flush with the concrete. Then drive stakes every 2 feet at most to hold it in place. Once you start compacting, a few inches per layer you might want more stakes. The foot distance will allow you to build a base out far enough that you may be able to remove the 2x6 later on and grade with soil to have more to mow.

For small jobs I use a 8" x 8" plate tamper to compactor by hand. After it is compacted and settled for a year you can dress it up or probably remove the 2x6 and grade and seed the area. But the farther out you can go the better as too steep of a slope will erode away with time.

Bud
 
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Old 04-26-14, 01:27 PM
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Bud,
So for a short wall like I would be building, I wouldn't need to use any concrete for the stakes would I? I am assuming when you say stakes you are talking about small posts to back the 2x6 with, right? I just want to make sure that I am thinking along the same line as you.
 
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Old 04-26-14, 01:52 PM
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You are correct. It is just that the number of stakes will depend upon the soil. If it is soft you will need more and deeper.

If you buy a tamper, you can do some extra compacting occasionally to keep it tight.

Bud
 
  #22  
Old 04-27-14, 03:15 AM
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i'd just get some sod & put it there,,, or try growing some grass then go get some adult beverage & chill my bride, nagzilla, is obviously more anal - she calls it ' focus ',,, i call it ' bs '
 
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