Stucco over OSB and Tyvek

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Old 04-27-14, 04:54 PM
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Stucco over OSB and Tyvek

Noticed the older threads mention stucco w/ chicken wire, while anything recent insists on self furring mesh with 6 inch spacing on fasteners. Has stucco really advanced or have regulations taken us to this extreme? Want to do it right, but not into an overkill. Central Texas, not much rain of late. Have OSB with Tyvek wrap at this point. Thinking 2 inches of R5 stucco foam for aesthetic reasons (more rounded look, I'm guessing) and insulation. Then need to know about the mesh and underlayment. That too seems to have advanced to black paper backed metal from the double black paper wrap put up separately of just recently. Would really appreciate input.
 
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Old 04-27-14, 07:22 PM
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Are you using synthetic stucco? If so, the only thing I would suggest is being prepared to deal with the problems you will be facing in the future. I'd suggest sticking with good old-fashioned, Portland cement-based stucco, using chicken wire under it. Been done that way for close to a century in NM, and the process still provides a durable finish (when installed properly, of course).
 
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Old 04-28-14, 05:08 PM
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That's what I was hoping to use. Just got back from a friends who did a strawbale/bamboo lathed home with old fashioned stucco you suggested...it really came out well. Of course this isn't my method, but even without the drip strip at the bottom, he has relatively no cracking after 15 years. Color is perfect, never retouched. He used chicken wire. I cannot even find a site or u-tube demo using that method. Do you have a go to site I might look at? I want to install this properly, but not overkill with this self furring if its not necessary.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 12:26 AM
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No, I can't point you to a U-tube or go-to site, as everything I've learned came from reading a few good reference books, or watching the work being done by experienced veteran installers in NM over the years. I suggest you go to a good bookstore (you know, where they sell those archaic things called books?), where you still might find a copy of a how-to book for people wanting to learn about stucco. I have several masonry reference books that deal with it, but can't presently locate them (my shop still has many unpacked boxes from our last move). Another source might be Fine Home Building magazine; their archives might have something useful for you to use.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 03:34 AM
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if using traditional hardcoat stucco, there's 1 method,,, if using eifs & synthetic, there's another,,, a big help is deciding which to use FIRST ! try looking in back issues of mother earth they had articles on strawbale const 20yrs ago
 
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Old 04-29-14, 07:01 AM
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I'm pretty committed to figuring it out over OSB and Tyvek. I have ordered a book on rock laying. I'm just trying to avoid whatever it is that makes stucco look horrific, and I've seen enough of that. I don't really like the look of the new plastic flexy stuff. I would like to have rounded edges to my windows and corners.

Thank you for your input. I'll check out Mother Earth, but not sure they even know what tyvek or osb is.

Keep the advice coming out there... and anybody in Texas that's doin it, much appreciated!
 
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Old 04-29-14, 10:51 AM
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I'm just trying to avoid whatever it is that makes stucco look horrific, and I've seen enough of that
I've applied very little stucco but have painted miles of it and I'm convinced that how bad/good a particular stucco job looks has more to do with the skill of the person that applied than the materials that were used. How well the stucco will hold up is dependent on the materials used but the looks boils down to the man holding the trowel.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 01:35 PM
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No doubt you are right. My friend who stucco'd over the strawbales said the pigment went into the first coat, and all the subsequent coats just made it all look better. Never painted it, would be a crime to change what he had. So maybe we can do it again.
 
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