Fixing door in brick wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-03-14, 08:38 AM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Exclamation Fixing door in brick wall

Hello!

There is a left-side section of the door jamb that is rotted. I was just going to cut out that section and then replace it with a small section of jamb, but when I took off the brickmolding on the one side, I noticed a big gap between the bricks and the house-wrapped plywood. This gap was full of old wasps nests. If you look at the right side, you can see that the brickmolding is aluminum wrapped, but there is no caulk to prevent wasps from going between the brick and aluminum and then into that gap behind the bricks.

Questions for you:

1. Is it normal for that gap to be so visible? Is there a practice to put some wood or metal or something (even a bead of expanding foam) along it, so it blocks that in? (I know the brickmold covers it, but does something supposed to cover it up before the brickmold goes up?)

2. I have two options that I see: 1) replace the whole door and frame with a new steel door and steel frame ($160 at HD), and then put in PVC (or similar) brickmolding ((for water and bug resistance). Use the brickmolding up against the gap (like the old brickmolding was doing) and then caulk the whole thing. (And then I may or may not re-wrap it with aluminum), or 2) cutout and replace the small section of the jamb, remove all the old brickmolding and aluminum, and then do like other option (use newer brickmolding against gap, caulk, maybe wrap). (Cheaper option, but lacks that new-door-smell , plus I like the idea of a steel frame. )

I appreciate the help! I bought this house used, so I want to fix it so no more bugs are getting into the walls, and any future chance of water damage is minimized.

Thanks!

Leaning
 
Attached Images     
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-03-14, 04:04 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I probably would have mounted a piece of pressure treated wood with a Hilti Shot Gun before installing the door. After that, I would have caulked that before installing the brick molding, then caulk again. You can do all that, if you replace the door.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-14, 04:26 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pulpo,

I agree that there should be something there (pressure-treated board or composite plank, etc.), but what is the best way to attach it??

Are you saying toe-nail it with the shot gun? (So one side would be toenailed into brick and the other into the stud/plywood? (I could also use construction adhesive, goop it up good, and then press it into the gap, let it dry, and then put the brickmolding and caulk.)

??

Regards,
Leaning
 
  #4  
Old 05-03-14, 04:59 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No, Hilti has to be a straight shot, not toenail. I was saying that's what I would have done from the beginning, before the door was installed. First, you have to decide if you are going to replace the door or not. I'm not a fan of the foam in a can stuff but it might work, if you just want to fill the gap & reinstall the molding.
 
  #5  
Old 05-03-14, 07:31 PM
J
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,297
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Something looks wrong to me with that whole install.
That aluminum threshold should have been over hanging the brick at the bottom not sitting way back like that.
On the inside jamb extensions would have brought the door jambs out even with the inside wall board.
 
  #6  
Old 05-03-14, 08:24 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,843
Received 642 Votes on 594 Posts
1). Normal? yes, its perfectly normal. Brick facade will always have a 1" gap behind it. There's nothing unusual about it and you can just put new brickmould on if you like.

2). that's really up to you. IMO if the little bit of rot is all that's wrong I would fix it.

I'll try and share some pictures below to show the process. The question of how to repair a rotten door jamb comes up pretty often, so the last time I did it I took a few pics. I used Azek, a solid PVC trim so that it will never rot again. As you can see in the pics, I glued up a couple pieces to make it thick enough and cut a slot for the weatherstripping kerf. the repaired piece is shimmed in to sit flush and plumb with the rest then it's attached to the stud, glued to the original jamb.

Name:  CAM00322.jpg
Views: 1758
Size:  42.4 KB
Name:  CAM00323.jpg
Views: 852
Size:  31.2 KB
Name:  CAM00325.jpg
Views: 971
Size:  31.2 KB
Name:  CAM00326.jpg
Views: 770
Size:  34.2 KB
Name:  CAM00327.jpg
Views: 1628
Size:  32.2 KB
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: