Wall crumbling

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-07-14, 05:44 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wall crumbling

I am new here and hopefully can get some help. I bought my current home 2 years ago and have a carport/garage that sits on top of a cinder block/concrete foundation. After moving in I noticed some crumbling on one side of the foundation. It wasn't much so I didn't think too much about it. Recently I noticed it has gotten worse and only appears to be on this one side. I really don't have the money right now to do any major repairs. Does anyone know what I should do? Here is a picture. Thank you in advance.

Name:  wall2.jpg
Views: 4691
Size:  50.5 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-07-14, 11:11 AM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Previous owner(s) noticed the crumbling, too, so he/they tried to cover it up with the white surface coat of mortar. A proper repair consists of removing the wall and replacing it with new concrete block, intended for severe weather exposure. Covering up the deteriorated blocks with more mortar would be a waste of money, although it might buy you some time before doing the complete removal/replacement when you can afford it.
 
  #3  
Old 05-07-14, 01:13 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Definitely not the answer I was wanting, but thank you for the response. If I could pick your brain for a moment. If I were to go ahead and replace the wall could I do that without the garage falling? Is it possible to just replace the bad section if the rest of the foundation seems to be good? Thank you
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-14, 01:29 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,545
Received 300 Votes on 266 Posts
I'm sure Bridgeman knows a LOT more about than me but back in the 50' or early 60's my father had to have a foundation wall rebuilt on his house. I don't remember a lot about it other than it was a messy job [basement wall] and my father complaining about how much it cost. The main thing is temporarily supporting what needs it while you replace all/part of the foundation.
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-14, 06:45 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
If the remainder of the wall is composed of the same style block, if you only replace the portion where they are presently deteriorated, you might be facing more replacement in the future. If it was mine, I would do it all and be done with it, instead of having to go through the entire process sometime down the road. And as marksr mentioned, it's extremely important that you have adequate temporary support in place before removing the existing wall.

Just remember--you aren't getting any younger. Nor will material costs be likely to come down in the future.
 
  #6  
Old 05-08-14, 06:02 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm sorry for all of the questions, but I really don't know much about this stuff. If I were to patch it temporarily, would it last me at least a year, so I could save up the money to get it completely replaced? Also what is the best way of patching it? Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 05-08-14, 07:53 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,545
Received 300 Votes on 266 Posts
I'd apply a coat or two of mortar for a temp fix. It would probably last a year or two but there are so many variables it's hard to say with any certainty.
 
  #8  
Old 05-08-14, 01:02 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It will probably last a year without patching it. I would add a temporary support instead, of a patch. Do you have any idea what type of footing was used?
 
  #9  
Old 05-09-14, 06:45 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No I really don't know what kind of footer was used. Most of the bottom is covered up, so I need to dig it out some to see. What type of support would you recommend, just some kind of post?
 
  #10  
Old 05-09-14, 02:02 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There should be block underground or a ribbon footing. Either one should go to the frost line. If you post some wide angled pics from the other side, of that wall, we may have some other suggestions.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: