Repair on serious concrete driveway cracks/crumbling


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Old 05-30-14, 06:02 PM
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Repair on serious concrete driveway cracks/crumbling

Hi all,

So I have a driveway that is in a bit of a state, this last winter in Michigan also really did a number on it. I realise that I should really replace the driveway, but that just isn't on the cards right now. I need to repair it so it'll last a few more seasons.

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So the small surface holes and surface cracks I figure I can get some concrete patch product and that should suffice.

My real concern is that crumbling.

I have done some research online and am beginning to piece together a plan, but I want to run it by some people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I figured I would rip out all the crumbled concrete till I reach some acceptable concrete, then I would sort out the sub base, I suspect that the sub base has sunken? I assume packing soil and gravel is best for this?

Then I thought about making some dowels from some rebar in the existing, better quality concrete, then pouring some fresh concrete in to the empty space, using some wood for a form on the lawn side.

Finally I would use a resurfacing product to give the whole driveway a uniform look.

Any advice or pointers on this would be greatly appreciated. I get that I should probably just replace, but like I said, just not an option yet. Too many other problems to deal with first!

Thanks in advance!

Mike
 
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Old 05-30-14, 08:14 PM
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weather doesn't bother good driveways,,, don't see any crumbling which would indicate a poor conc mix,,, i see severe edge cracking which's probably due to: insufficiently compacted bass mtl; early loading, or severe edge weight,,, main crk is likely due to no sawed/grooved contraction jnt but its a jnt - properly seal it,,, same w/other crks,,, IF the crks happened on your watch, proper repairs & maintenance would've prevented more damage

if your d/w's 4", i wouldn't use steel as it adds no compressive strength but can't hurt IF its placed properly in the right vertical axis,,, concern yourself w/well-compacted granular base instead

resurfacing's a different topic - most won't invest $ for good mtl then complain when it doesn't last,,, don't look for any decent resurfacing stuff @ apron/vest stores
 
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Old 05-31-14, 07:11 AM
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Thanks stadry,

Driveway was more-or-less like this when we moved in last summer, but I guess that once it starts to deteriorate beyond a surface crack it breaks up rather quickly.

What do you mean by placing the steel in the correct vertical axis?

WRT resurfacing material; is there any product you would recommend to use or stay well clear of? My research kept coming up with Quickcrete Resurfacer, but as they sell this at HD I assume it isn't that great?

Mike
 
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Old 05-31-14, 12:37 PM
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you're very smart - it sucks ! ( but that's my professional opinion ! ) for steel to be of any use, it must be placed w/2" of conc OVER it AND 2" UNDER it therefore rebar can't be used in a 4" driveway - it MUST be 4.5" thick for # 4 ( 1/2" ) bar,,, # 8 bar ( 1" ) would need a 6" thick driveway,,, while we're at it, fiber only helps fiber suppliers make outrageous boat pymts,,, never saw a slab that benefitted from having fiber in it,,, better you should pay attn to a properly designed & installed joint pattern

concretenetwork.com, concretelocator.com, decorativeconcrete.com/forum
 
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Old 05-31-14, 08:35 PM
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The previous post sounds like a rich contractor's "boat envy." But I digress.

The most practical steel reinforcement for a 4" slab is heavy welded-wire mesh, placed on chairs or dobies to hold it off the compacted base material. Far too many contractors lay their mesh right on-grade, with zero concrete under it, and where it doesn't do any good. Might just as well dig a large hole next to the pour, and bury all of the mesh in it.
 
 

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