What type of caulking do I use?

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Old 06-04-14, 12:52 PM
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What type of caulking do I use?

I have recently purchased a new home and the inspector said to fill the gap that is on the exterior of the home between the wall. I was instructed to add backing rod and then seal with caulking (see photo).

What type of caulking do I use? Sorry if I am not coherent, I have little idea on how to explain the gap.
Thank you!
 
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Old 06-04-14, 12:57 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

How wide is the gap? in the pic it doesn't look like it's wide enough to need a backer rod. Are you wanting to use a clear caulk or a colored caulk that matches the soffit?
 
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Old 06-04-14, 01:02 PM
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It's about the size of the top of a pen.
Guess I don't care about color to much, just want what will be best for the job as far as quality goes.
 
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Old 06-04-14, 01:10 PM
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Most any quality caulk should do a good job. Like most things, price is a good indicator of quality. I suspect getting a clear latex caulk would work best for you. It goes on milky but dries clear.

something like this - Shop DAP 10.1-oz Clear Paintable Latex Window and Door Caulk at Lowes.com
 
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Old 06-04-14, 02:45 PM
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If your eye is drawn to it after it's caulked then it probably wasn't a good idea to caulk it in the first place. (messy caulking) Using a clear sealant is a good idea but don't go into it thinking the word clear means "invisible". You can still clearly see a messy clear caulk job, especially when it gets on the stone/siding veneer. This looks like the sort of thing where an inspector was really trying hard to find something to write down.

IMO I would leave it as is unless there is something that looks worse than what's pictured in the photo.
 
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Old 06-05-14, 04:11 AM
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What was the reasoning for caulking the soffit to the brick. As X said, that isn't something that is normally caulked.

I agree that a messy caulk job looks bad and while you can see when a clear caulk job is botched up - it isn't near as noticeable as messy white [or any color] caulk job! When using latex caulks it's best to have a damp rag handy so you can keep the tube's tip clean as needed and remove any errant caulk while it's wet ..... but there is no substitute for applying it neatly/correctly!!
 
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Old 06-05-14, 05:11 AM
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Most any quality caulk should do a good job. Like most things, price is a good indicator of quality. I suspect getting a clear latex caulk would work best for you. It goes on milky but dries clear.

something like this - Shop DAP 10.1-oz Clear Paintable Latex Window and Door Caulk at Lowes.com
May I hi-jack this thread for moment? Thanks

Marksr you make a good point about that caulk going on milky and drying clear. The problem is it might take up to two weeks for it to "clear". We had many tubes returned to us at the store because it wasn't "clearing" in a reasonable time. The manufacture finally sent out a notice telling us to warn the customer the time it might take to clear.

I agree with the others that the pic looks fine.
 
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Old 06-05-14, 05:16 AM
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A lot depends on how thick the clear latex caulk is applied and the humidity. I don't recall ever personally seeing it take more than 24 hrs to get clear. I have seen a few cases where the clear cured caulking had clouded back up because of rain but then cleared back up after things dried.
 
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Old 06-05-14, 09:47 AM
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I suspect the home inspector suggested sealing the openings to prevent wasps and other tiny critters from moving in and starting a colony. But I agree that backing rod is not needed, unless someone wanted to use it by itself and forget the caulk--the proper size and color would be close to invisible when stuffed in flush, and it sure wouldn't make a mess on anything.
 
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Old 06-06-14, 07:38 AM
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Smile Thank you

Thank you everyone, I appreciate your response. I am going to give it a try.
 
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Old 06-08-14, 04:34 AM
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you could use caulk but caulk's not that great NOR is it flexible imo,,, better you should use sika ( there are other brands, too ) polyurethane - you can get it in colors, too,,, vertical / knife grade & self-leveling for flat work [ no $ interest ]
 
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Old 06-08-14, 05:03 AM
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The sikaflex I've used was a caulking
 
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Old 06-09-14, 02:44 AM
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never knew sika even made caulk as all we use are joint sealants but that's good to know, thx, mark

btw, sikaflex isn't caulk - its a polyurethane joint sealant,,, sika also makes polysulfide, silicone, & urethane,,, all tube materials caulk ain't necessarily caulk,,, caulk's sold in the paint section of apron/vest stores - painters generally use caulks & conc guys use jnt sealants,,, jnt sealants are found in the masonary supply aisle,,, do they sell self-leveling AND gun grade sikaflex ? in color ? we buy from pro supply shops so generally don't know what the apron/vest stores have

thanks in adv
 
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Old 06-09-14, 04:03 AM
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I've always considered any type of sealant that comes in a caulking tube - caulk. The lion's share of caulking that I've used has been latex caulk used during paint prep [along with the occasional polyurethane, butyl and silicone caulks] but from time to time jobs will come up that spec different caulks. Normally they can be purchased at the local paint store but occasionally the caulk will need to be sourced elsewhere. I don't think I've ever used any caulking that was self leveling, including the caulk that comes in buckets and gets applied with a self loading caulking gun.

Anyway, I can't see any sealant that isn't in caulking tube form being a viable option for the OP since he wants to close the gap between the soffit and the brick. Impossible to use a knife grade or self leveling product upside down! Because of the skill level needed to apply a neat bead against brick, I think a clear caulk is the OP's best bet.
 
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Old 06-09-14, 07:23 PM
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sealants come packaged in small tubes, large tubes, 3gal, 5gal, & 55gal units,,, imagine the same can be said for caulks,,, i'm not a painter - our original trade was joint sealing which led into hgwy conc reprs,,, so we approach the same problem from different directions

sikaflex has 2 grades - vertical or gun-grade & self-leveling for horizontal work,,, silicone comes the same - eg, dow 888 needs ' tooling ' & 888sl is self-leveling,,, dow also has 890 & 890sl but that's for asphalt roadway joints.

impo, the correct repair is closed cell backer rod & gun-grade sealant tooled w/his wife cake spatula,,, that's how we've ( & all other pro's ) do the work & have for 30yrs,,, that doesn't mean there aren't other ways to get to his goal - just how we & other pro's do it,,, all the above mtls are packaged in tubes - some even in sausages for bulk guns
 
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Old 06-10-14, 03:42 AM
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"bulk guns" I knew those caulking guns had a name that was alluding me got one hanging up in the shop somewhere, haven't used it in years

Not saying it couldn't be neatly done but I wouldn't want to tool any sealant/caulking with any type of knife upside down against brick
 
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Old 06-11-14, 03:26 AM
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that's because you were a painter,,, caulkers use bulk guns & spatulas,,, set runs from 3/8" to 1 1/2" generally - all stainless steel,,, i generally use 1" for our joint work,,, don't recall using a knife other than the 15" razor blade knives we used to remove old jnt sealants

different trades = different tools
 
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