Drain pipe through footer


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Old 06-11-14, 06:58 AM
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Drain pipe through footer

I am pouring a 16" wide footer that is 8" deep and I want to put a 3" or 4" diameter PVC thinwall drain pipe perpendicular through it on ground level, but I have two continuous rebars 2" from the bottom inside the footer. How is this supposed to be done? Is the rebar supposed to be bent in an arch to go up and over the pipe? Should horizontal rebar be used as well near the pipe? Should the pipe be wrapped in anything such as pipe wrap tape?

Thanks
 
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Old 06-11-14, 04:34 PM
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Why does a drain pipe have to go through the footing? Can post some pics?
 
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Old 06-11-14, 05:07 PM
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What are you building? In Ohio I'm wondering why your 8" deep footer has rebar hitting a pipe at ground level. Don't your footings have to be below the frost line?
 
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Old 06-12-14, 07:28 AM
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We need more info! How far below the surface is the footer going to be? What is going to be placed on top of the footer? How are you placing the pipe through the footer?
 
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Old 06-15-14, 08:01 AM
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Thanks for the replies. When I said an 8" deep footer I meant an 8" thick footer. Some pictures that best explain what I am trying to say is http://www.epa.gov/indoorairplus/tec...es/large/2.jpg

and

http://www.epa.gov/indoorairplus/tec...es/large/6.jpg

It shows a pipe going through the footer, but it seems like where it is placed would hit the rebar, since the rebar is supposed to be 2 or 3 inches above the bottom of the footer. So how should the rebar be placed where the pipe runs through the footer?

Thanks
 
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Old 06-15-14, 08:27 AM
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I must be missing something. Is that sump pump system moving water from outside to inside & then out again? Or, is the sump pump ejecting water from another source?
 
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Old 06-15-14, 09:39 AM
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It is a common exterior drain the runs to an interior sump. Usually, the footing is thickened, if reinforced, the pipe is cast into the footing. It keeps the sump inside in an area where it can be checked, along with the flow from the perforated drains.

There are many regional differences in practices and usually anything planned for done during the construction is cheaper and better in the end. I have seen builders that put in both interior and exterior drain tile and drain the exterior through the footing in 3/4" flexible plastic because they wanted or had a wet basement. That was their standard for every home, no matter what the local soil conditions were.

Dick
 
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Old 06-15-14, 05:43 PM
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It makes no sense to me but I'll take your word for it. So many things can go wrong with that solution.
 
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Old 06-15-14, 07:55 PM
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Pulpo

There was a mistake in the last sentence and totally wrong description of the desires of the builder.

Instead of saying "because they wanted", it should have said "they never wanted a wet basement". There is a big difference.

The builder built average and above average tract homes at various locations (soil types) and did about 300 homes a year for many years with virtually no foundation problems.

Dick
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:51 AM
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Either way, I never heard of pumping water in just to pump it out again. That's what doesn't make sense, for a number or reasons.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 07:12 AM
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Like Concrete said, they thicken the footer so you can run the rebar under the the insert. I have also seen contractors place pieces of concrete brick under the insert to allow for enough room to flow around the insert. The contractor would place a wooden plug on both sides of the pipe to screw through the footer form to hold the insert in place and keep any concrete form getting into the insert.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 07:38 AM
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It is not pumped - it s because of gravity and water wants to seeks its own level. The only pump is inside and can easily be monitored or replaced and no exterior wiring has to done for a pump.

The pvc perforated drains had an invert about 2" below the bottom of the footings and had at least 4" of rock on the sides. The the walls were block. The system worked well to prevent the slab from having high soil pressures that contribute or cause cracks. Usually, the floor was poured a month or two later to speed construction. In my home with a copied system, saw that the time lag is the water flow was significant and water flows did not start until about a day after the start of a major rain and keep going for a couple of days or more after because the deep drain tile really sucked the excess water out of the soil.

He never had a wet basement and it was standard on every home built.

Dick
 
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Old 06-16-14, 09:58 AM
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Using wooden end plugs on the embedded pipe (as someone mentioned) wouldn't be a good idea, because that means there wouldn't be any pipe ends projecting from the footing to splice onto. Better to run the pipe through the footing side forms by at least 3" at each end (by cutting circular holes in those forms) and placing temporary end caps on the pipe to keep dirt out until it's ready to be tied into the drainage system.
 
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Old 06-18-14, 08:11 AM
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I have seen several contractors cut plugs to fit inside 3" or 4" PVC pipe cut to the exact dimensions of the footer width. The pipes were placed prior to the concrete footer pour and secured on both sides with screws. This held the pipe in place till after the pour. When the contractor removed the forms, the plugs came out or they left them in until after the footer was backfilled. The locations were marked with a crayon at the top of the wall and were excavated later to install the pipe going through the footer.
 
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Old 06-18-14, 08:54 AM
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The foregoing works only if an over-sized pipe sleeve is used, with the actual pipe being inserted through the sleeve after form removal.
 
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Old 06-18-14, 03:09 PM
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That is Correct BM. All the projects I worked on it specified in the Project specification at all pipes be sleeved through concrete.
 
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Old 06-18-14, 03:50 PM
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It is a common exterior drain the runs to an interior sump. Usually, the footing is thickened, if reinforced, the pipe is cast into the footing. It keeps the sump inside in an area where it can be checked, along with the flow from the perforated drains.
Yes that is the correct way to do it. As a plumber and seeing my share of homes being built this was often the case with high water tables, and the mc-mansions with 4 bedrooms in the basements..

If it was not done this way then the builder cut corners and the homes will always have water issues. Best to do it when the home is built or you will need to excavate and do it anyway if you want livable space in a finished basement with water issues...

More often though in NJ the pit is usually outside, with dual pumps and alarm. These then pump to the storm drain or runoff area the builders put in per code..

As far as sealing cement and tar from what I remember...



 

Last edited by lawrosa; 06-18-14 at 04:07 PM.
 

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