Not sure if I should fix this poured foundation crack or ignore it........


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Old 06-11-14, 11:20 PM
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Not sure if I should fix this poured foundation crack or ignore it........

I am new to the forum and hoping to get some advice

I am in the midst of a removing the small rotting Lean To shed on the back of my garage, and replacing it with a larger shed. Shed Rebuild Post here with a couple of albums of pictures -Shed Rebuild Post and Picture Albums

Here are pictures of the my foundation crack - Pictures

I originally planned to build on to the existing shed, but after seeing rot and ant infestation I decided to tear the whole thing down and start over. After I took off the existing shed frame I found a crack in the foundation behind one of the stud walls.

The garage is probably around 40+ years old, and has a poured concrete foundation with a separately poured concrete pad Like This Both are in good condition with the exception of this crack.

From what I read Here it seems like this is a settling crack and could stay unchanged indefinitely.

My question is if I should do anything to remedy this crack before building my shed addition that would obstruct it? Should I use an injection method Like This. to fix it before continuing? Or should I just leave it alone and continue my shed project?

Here are pictures of the crack
 
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Old 06-12-14, 08:37 AM
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You might as well try to do something, with it. It can't hurt. It's your last chance.
 
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Old 06-12-14, 10:56 PM
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Use epoxy injection to structurally (and permanently) fill the crack, using a low-modulus, low-viscosity product, pumped through injection ports. And if the garage is built on footings below the frost line, those shallow pier blocks will cause your new shed to frost heave every year, causing potential leakage where its roof meets the garage (which isn't heaving).
 
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Old 06-13-14, 03:32 AM
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even if you successfully repair the crack ( emecole is VERY diy friendly ) [ NO $ interest ], if the foundation's not below the frost line, it will crack again - either next to the existing crk or nearby as the frost stress seems stronger there.

should you decide to repair the crk & retain us for the work, we'd inject w/polyurethane hydrophyllic mtl - it likes water & will work provided you successfully clean ( flush out ) the crack prior to injection.

ps - the ' pump ' can be a dble chambered hand-powered gun similar to a bodacious caulk gun doubt you can rent them & they cost us $ 145 ea - material comes in a dble tube - think we pay $ 45 per small caulk gun size - you might need 2 units

as an alternative, how many yrs has this been sitting there ? you may not need anything - if you're in the city, you don't get much frost - if you're in cheektowaga, you get more,,, heavy lingering snowfalls insulate against deep frosts - yada, yada, yada

good luck !
 
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Old 06-13-14, 09:31 AM
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Thanks for the advice on using epoxy injection. I did read that epoxy injection can cause cracks elsewhere if the root of the problem isn't fixed since the repaired area can't flex, but settling cracks usually don't continue from what I understand. Do you think I should be concerned about that?

And if the garage is built on footings below the frost line, those shallow pier blocks will cause your new shed to frost heave every year, causing potential leakage where its roof meets the garage (which isn't heaving)

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/br...#ixzz34X7n55i8
The garage footing is definitely below the frost line, because my cities building department would of required a permit and inspection. The pier blocks you see are left over from the shed I am replacing. I plan to pour (8) 8" wide x 48" deep concrete piers for the foundation of the new 8' x 20' lean to shed. I was considering another on grade foundation to begin with, but since I am in Ohio I didn't want to risk the frost heave.
 
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Old 06-13-14, 09:41 AM
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The foundation is definitely past the frost line, but I have no idea how long the crack has been there or exactly how old the garage is. I just bought the house a year ago, and the crack was there when I moved in.

My concern is that the garage is in good shape, and after I put all my crap in this new shed. I plan to turn the garage into my wood shop, so I don't want to see foundation problems 5 years down the road.
 
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Old 06-13-14, 08:41 PM
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If low-modulus epoxy is used to fill a crack (as stated in my earlier post), additional cracking elsewhere is not likely to occur because of the "flex" built into low modulus material. Not all epoxies are the same. High-modulus epoxy is strong but quite brittle, and using it often results in additional, nearby cracking to occur in the parent material, especially if the source of the cracking has not been eliminated.
 
 

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