Is this a DIY foundation repair?


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Old 06-30-14, 01:59 PM
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Is this a DIY foundation repair?

Hi All,

This is the back corner of my garage. Years of poor grading, downspout too close & freeze/thaw.

I'm pretty handy, but not sure if a DIY'r can do an effective repair on this -- see photo. Thoughts?

Thanks, GeoffName:  Foundation.jpg
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Old 06-30-14, 04:25 PM
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If you've never worked or finished concrete, properly repairing this could result in being in over your head. Probably the trickiest part will be to form it while still allowing access for the new concrete. I'd be tempted to gain access from inside the garage (behind and under the wall), or over-size the exterior forms and taper-finish the exposed top. The latter is a technique we often used to repair concrete bridge substructure members (piers and abutments) when concrete access was otherwise difficult or impossible.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 04:57 PM
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I think that you can DIY, The first thing I would do is see how far down the current foundation goes. A couple of footings could be used while you work on the forms.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 07:10 PM
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A few more thoughts...

Thanks for the replies gentlemen. Tomorrow I'll excavate deeper and further along the two walls to see what I find.

To repair I'm thinking I'd pull out any of the large pieces that I'm able to and set forms so that above grade they'd be flush with the existing foundation, and taper outward as they go down. This would mean pouring a footing at the base, and having a few inches or clear stone below it -- does that sound right? Should I pour the footing first and let cure?

Access for the pour will be an issue. What about leaving a couple of inches at top of the form, and pouring to that, and then dry packing afterwards -- any merit in that, or a complete bad idea? Can this be done mixing the concrete in a wheelbarrow, or rent a mixer?

Also, should there be a bonding agent between the existing foundation and the pour? How else should the existing be prepped -- acid wash or anything?

I've got a "foundation guy" coming tomorrow to give a quote, my first one. Any particular questions to figure out if he really knows what he's doing?

Thanks again!

Geoff
 
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Old 06-30-14, 07:46 PM
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Ask him if he has done any repair work locally, that you can see.
 
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Old 07-01-14, 01:04 AM
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Also ask him where and how he learned to perform structural concrete repairs, since you've heard that doing concrete repairs correctly requires more knowledge than just placing new flatwork. Also ask him what the maximum water/cement ratio of his repair concrete will be, how he plans to cure the repairs, and how many years his warranty will be for, such that any cracking that occurs will be repaired at his cost. And make sure to ask him what he thinks caused the failure, since you're sure it resulted from more than simply improper drainage at the garage's exterior.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 11:15 AM
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Thanks again.

The "foundation repairman" came and had a look and quickly wondered how deep the cracks go, what about those other cracks, boy the garage floor sure is cracked, that's an awfully big tree nearby and this area has a lot of leda clay...you best have an engineering firm have a look. So I have one coming on Friday and another to still schedule. Any point in that discussion I should make sure happen?

Looking like I'm exiting the DIY option for this one...

Any other thoughts?

Thanks,
Geoff
 
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Old 07-02-14, 11:23 AM
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Well, looks like you found an honest guy. He knew it was beyond his skill set and recommended an engineer. Keep him in mind for future work.

You'll probably have to call around to a few firms and find someone who specializes in your problem.
 
 

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