Painted Stoop


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Old 07-02-14, 07:42 PM
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Painted Stoop

guapo's Recent Uploads | Photobucket

I have a customer who wants his stoop rebuilt. It's mostly brick with a concrete landing. He wants me to replace the brick but use the existing core. I imagine that I can pressure wash the landing to remove the paint & remove the brick with a chisel or jack hammer. Then rebuild it with new brick & mortar. Am I missing anything? Let me know if the photobucket link doesn't work.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:33 PM
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Wow... you are braver than I am. I'd run... not walk... away from a project like that!

The problem I would envision is water getting into the joint where the concrete meets the brick perimeter, then freezing and popping the bricks loose in winter. There's also a stair nosing requirement that you would need to abide by... (3/4" minimum, 1 1/4" maximum) and of course the minimum tread width of 10" and maximum stair height of 7 3/4", with individual rise and run of the entire staircase not varying by more than 3/8". Minimum stair width is 36", (looks ok?) and I see it's missing the handrail for the stairs. Handrail balluster spacing- larger than 4" sphere must not pass through. Handrail size (minimum 1 1/4" diameter, 2" maximum) looks good. The decorative bricks on the left and right sides of each riser are probably a code violation as a tripping hazard. Also worrisome if it's not all on a continuous footing, you would probably inherit any problems that would occur due to frost (cracking, spalling). Separate or inadequate footings would move differently during years with bad frost heave. Maybe something to put in the contract. (not responsible for....)

After you demo the brick, you'll want a grinder and a cup wheel (add $50 to the bid for that!) to smooth up the surface.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 11:13 PM
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Ask the client if he'd consider a cost-plus (force account) contract, where he pays you an hourly sum for your labor and actual material costs plus standard mark-up. Going that route means you wouldn't get caught by surprises underneath that brick work, such as the core concrete being absolute junk and requiring complete replacement.

I'd also check with the local AHJ to make sure they don't have any unique landing requirements.
 
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Old 07-03-14, 08:58 AM
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I don't need a contract with that customer. I've known him for 20 years. I can always tell him that there is no guarantee that the core will be good & ask him if he wants to take that chance. As far as the design goes, I could use bull nose where needed & adjust everything to meet code. I knew about the railing not being to code.
 
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Old 07-05-14, 04:13 AM
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i don't see a big deal there - you're fine from what i see & read,,, ' force account ' is a dot term whereby the owner ( typically dot's ) order contractors to complete certain items/works [ they often argue payment amounts later in court ],,, we dumb contractors usually call it ' time & materials ' or ' gentlemen's agreement,,, i never found any dot that could meet those rqmts however, on occasion, we did work items for various eic's who paid us for taking down trees as compensation avoided mucho paperworko that way
 
 

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