Rebuilding Brick Front Porch on an incline.....


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Old 07-15-14, 11:40 PM
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Rebuilding Brick Front Porch on an incline.....

Hi everyone! I'm new here but certainly not new to DIY. I'm a landlord to a wonderful rental home and have been an avid DIY'er for over 15 years. My latest project last weekend was rebricking an exterior wall that had gaped away from the wall on the garage side of the home that I live in (I have two homes, the rental and the one I live in). So I'm certainly not scared of DIY projects, but my husband (who is not an avid DIY'er but goes along with my projects and helps occasionally) is convinced that this is not a DIY project but will be something that needs to be done by a Pro. So, I'm asking the group for advice please! I'm already in the process of clearing the other side of the stairs (which you can't see in the picture) as the concrete pad and existing structure must be completely torn down and rebuilt. Mudjacking is not an option as the root cause is the drainage and overall structure of the porch and foundation. I've gotten estimates, and it's about $4K to have the existing structure jacked and new footers put in, which is just a bandaid for the problem. I think that I can do this with the assistance of a concrete certified contractor who has agreed to help me with the pad and concrete pour, floating, rebar and reinforcement to the existing home foundation, etc. Once the pad is in and cured, the rest is just a basic concrete block base with brick overlay. Of course, I can do everything with enough time, knowledge and materials but I want the real feedback from the group please! Is this a DIY for a fairly advanced DIY'er? Or is this a project that a DIY'er can't do?Name:  Front Porch Repair.jpg
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Old 07-16-14, 06:17 AM
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Almost everything can be a DIY job if you are up for the task. The big problem with your project is the scale and the mass/weight of what you're dealing with. It sounds like you are aware of the scale and realize that if you just keep working at it you can finish it. Many people are simply not used to hard work and give up on anything that can't be finished in a couple hours or if it give them sore muscles. With the right attitude you can get the steps built and have a gym membership all rolled into one.
 
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Old 07-16-14, 11:18 AM
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Why not just pour a new concrete footing with integral stoop, eliminating the need for any block work? Just make sure adequate brick ties are embedded in the formwork. Doing so would save a lot of time and work.
 
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Old 07-16-14, 12:24 PM
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I researched that, and the incline is very steep (8 feet) on the other side if the porch. Plus, there are water lines that run below, and I don't want the weight of complete concrete sitting there as I think it would be a matter of time before we have a bigger problem that we do now. I've designed the new porch to be wider across the front with a portico, and I am very comfortable with my plan for a concrete footer reinforced, then using concrete blocks and ties ( and a ton of rebar) to rebuild my new porch with a brick veneer. Make sense, or am I really crazy as my husband thinks?
 
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Old 07-16-14, 02:35 PM
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If your block and brick laying skills are up to it, just go for it. Before adding substantial weight and structure on top of any water line, I'd think seriously about relocating the water line, just to enable making future water line repairs without costing many thousands of additional dollars.

But FWIW, the incline you mentioned would have little or no effect on the performance of a solid concrete stoop vs. an infilled one. Presuming everything is properly tied into the house's foundation, of course.
 
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Old 07-16-14, 03:37 PM
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Wink

I've already started on getting quotes to have it moved since this will be a 2 month project anyway. But I'm wondering what else isn't quite right that we just haven't discovered yet! Hopefully not a ton of work since we have an open basement and the main valve is right on the other side of the wall. But maybe that will go smoothly! Thanks for your feedback, will look into a solid form again.
 
 

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