foundation chip

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Old 08-01-14, 06:25 PM
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foundation chip

I would like to fix this foundation chip myself. I bought cement but would like to make sure I am fixing the problem correctly. Could someone please take a moment to tell me the best way to repair the foundation to reduce the chance of it happening again?

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Old 08-01-14, 09:00 PM
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How did it happen to begin with? Did you do it or did you just find it like that?
I would just use ordinary cement to patch it. No biggie.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 12:06 PM
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Unless you eliminate the piece of rusting steel first, any repair you do will fail again. That's because steel expands as it corrodes (up to 7 times its original volume), which places any concrete between it and the outside surface in tension. The result is concrete spalling off when the applied tensile forces exceed the inherent tensile strength of the concrete (which for most concrete is less than 100 PSI).
 
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Old 08-06-14, 02:56 PM
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I am sorry it took so long to reply. I had to figure out how to get back into the website and to this section.

I don't know how it happen. I just found that large chip. Someone did look at it. He told me that the person that built the house should have removed it during the contraction. I was going to cost around $400.00 to get it repaired. Ouch!

It looks like based on the other reply, I need to remove the metal. I will work on chipping it away. After I remove the metal, I am assuming I will mix the cement with water to get a thick consistence. I will fill the hole with the wet cement but I am not sure how to keep it looking smooth and not letting gravity pull it to the ground. Any suggestions? Shari
 
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Old 08-06-14, 03:00 PM
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Thank you. I will work on chipping the metal away. Once it is gone, i am trying to figure out how to keep the wet cement in a vertical position until it drys. Any suggestions? Shari
 
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Old 08-06-14, 03:02 PM
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I wouldn't just cut out the metal until you know what purpose it serves. It could be part of a bolt that holds that section of the house framing to concrete. Is this a foundation wall alone or is it part of a slab?

Being a painter and not a mason, I'd wire wheel the rust to get as clean as I could, apply a rust inhibitive primer and the fill the chip with mortar after the primer dried. Hopefully the masons will either concur or let you know how far off base I am
 
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Old 08-06-14, 07:29 PM
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The rusted steel doesn't look like a critical tension member in the stem wall, but more likely just a (somewhat redundant) shear connector that was inadvertently placed too close to the wall's exterior face. I would be tempted to chip it out and remove it, but vigorously grinding/cleaning it followed by rattle-canning with zinc-rich paint would be a second choice. I wouldn't use pure cement (what you previously mentioned you bought a bag of) to make the repair, as it doesn't have enough strength or bonding capability by itself. You'll get better performance from a pre-packaged concrete mix, which will have sand and small rock in it besides the cement; many concrete patch or repair mixes come with a bonding agent in them as well. Many different types are sold at your local big-box store. Just don't rely on a guy wearing a colored vest to recommend the best one--you can make that choice based on your own internet research, reading performance reviews of various concrete repair products and manufacturers' recommended uses for each.

The repair concrete should be mixed "stiff," meaning not so wet that it flows. It should then be dry-packed into place using a hand float. For repairs on vertical faces, I've always had good results using a stiff rubber hand float, as it has both the density to enable firmly pushing material into place and also provides a nice-looking, rough surface texture for the final pass. Following installation instructions (right on the package) for any product used is critical.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 05:03 AM
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I was thinking the steel might be part of a tie down bolt - couldn't remember the name yesterday
 
 

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