Add concrete to aggregate driveway

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Old 08-02-14, 12:34 PM
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Add concrete to aggregate driveway

My new-ish aggregate driveway is not graded well at the top, water on the driveway in that area runs back to the garage door and into the garage, rather than away from the garage as it should. I've had to extend my downspout past this area so water collected in the eaves doesn't end up in my garage as well.

I was thinking one solution might be to add some concrete across my driveway like a speed bump to prevent this back flow. Can I just pour new concrete over my aggregate which has been previously sealed? Can anyone think of a better idea for this problem?
 
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Old 08-02-14, 01:15 PM
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You can add a concrete speed bump but I'm thinking it would be ugly. Maybe you could also do it in the same exposed aggregate so it' matches as best possible.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 01:20 PM
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When you say aggregate, do you mean stone or pavement? Send a pic for us to look at.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 02:00 PM
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That's the term I was looking for...exposed aggregate! I would like to match as closely to the original as possible, and you're right using plain concrete would look terrible, but can I get the materials I need at a big box store?


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Old 08-02-14, 02:41 PM
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You could build up a small curb at the garage entrance, say 2 inches. Use the same aggregate. But in winter it will pool and freeze. You'll than have an ice spot as you drive into the garage. That could mean possible damage.
Another solution might be to dig a small gutter or trench just in front of garage, fill it with small gravel. You might even cover it with a grate. have it drain off to the side.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 03:42 PM
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Good point. The water often comes from around both sides of the garage, especially when the snow melts, so maybe I could get away with one strip on either side of the garage door? Then it wouldn't matter if it pooled and froze, wouldn't be driving over those areas.

So could one normally get their hands on a small amount of this kind of material without involving a concrete guy? It wouldn't be that much material and probably not worth his time in terms of work anyway.

Also can I just pour right over existing sealed driveway? Would I need to rig up some kind of form to get that raised rounded look?
 
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Old 08-02-14, 07:41 PM
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Since you described it as being "newish," why not bring the contractor back who poured it, and ask him how he proposes to fix the mess he left you?
 
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Old 08-02-14, 09:45 PM
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Newish = built in 2011 and there is only a one year home warranty on new homes built around here. Unfortunately we had record snowfall that year and so I chalked it up to that - didn't realize it was a grade issue until much later, and builder would just come back and say it was due to the way the ground had settled I'm sure.
 
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Old 08-03-14, 09:29 AM
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If the ground had settled, such would result in water running away from the garage instead of towards it. But, whatever.

So it looks like you have 2 options: either build a mountable dam, or cut and remove concrete to form a drain in the driveway. I've done the latter, in a heated garage where melting snow/ice from the vehicles would form a large pool, running towards the door and freezing at the rubber gasket on cold mornings. Since I was monitoring the entire house's construction, I knew the builder had placed a thick layer of gravel (6"?) before he poured the garage floor, otherwise I wouldn't have attempted it. Working in depth increments, I made 2 parallel sawcuts completely through the slab, just an inch apart, removing all of the concrete between them and filling the gap with washed rock. The drain worked extremely well. I intentionally kept the cut lines close together to avoid having to install a grate system, but it was still a lot of work. If I had to do it today, I'd pay a concrete cutting outfit to do the messy work for me.

Building a dam would be about the same amount of work, especially if you intend to duplicate the exposed aggregate finish of the driveway. For the gradually-humped dam to remain anchored in place, you need to make 2 parallel sawcuts in the concrete at the edge lines of the dam, and then carefully chip out at least an inch of the existing concrete, without cracking or damaging the surrounding concrete. The new concrete will be locked in place by the "trench" you built, along with a bonding agent needed. The placed concrete needs to be stiff enough to maintain the mountable "hump" without sloughing, while being loose enough to enable broadcasting/floating in some matching colored aggregate. You should be able to buy a bag of the stuff at a local concrete supply place, or even a landscaping supplier. If you've never finished concrete, or done exposed aggregate finish work, you might consider having someone skilled in the trade do it for you.
 
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Old 08-03-14, 10:05 AM
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that has the appearance of ' seeded ' conc, not traditional exposed aggregate - 2 things suggest that answer: 1, the cost of producing such a conc quantity for a paved d/w would be exorbitant; & 2, the aggregate appears graded / not crushed,,, this suggests bags from an apron/vest store rather than traditional transit mix.

its doubtful the conc NOR the genl contractor will do anything,,, even the home warranty is probably useless as water is generally only covered in the 1st warranty year.

we've blt several water diversion devices,,, we install pins into the conc to hold the ' bump ' in place mechanically rather than depend on adhesion bond strength,,, score proper jnts into the fresh conc so it cracks where YOU want rather than random cracking on its own which it surely will,,, even seed it if you wish,,, you'll probably not be able to match the existing conc's color w/apron/vest store bagg'd stuff but w/good seeing, you'll get a close as possible,,, another aid is mixing buff color into your mix water then add to the conc mix - good luck
 
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Old 08-03-14, 10:23 AM
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Depending on the height you need to add to raise the grade by your garage you may be able to purchase cold patch asphalt material and spread and tamp down ( can even done by driving over repeatedly). I work for my states Dept of roads and lf you get hold of or know someone there, you may be able to get enough leftover graded aggregate and asphalt binder samples to mix it for free.
 
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Old 08-04-14, 04:22 AM
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IF it were OUR atl driveway, i'd rethink using asphalt on a conc d/w- even from a quik drive-by inspections, 1 realizes cold patch repairs are only temporary IF what i see on roads is typical we often build water diversion structures for condo units, etc,,, while we'd normally ask an engineer to calculate water-flow, etc, for some locations [ ONLY when the city of atl requires a ' stormwater runoff disturbance permit - a process that can easily cost the owner $1,000's ], common sense & a cast-in-place w/pins system works great - its fast, permanent, not unnatractive, & rarely involves diamond sawing/chipping/grinding,,, for my $, your original thought's still the best idea posted - congrats - are YOU an engineer too ?

diamond sawing conc isn't difficult but can be challenging if one's not used to the work,,, having sawed miles both inside & outside, never gave cleanup much thought 'cept when bidding work -even bdge grooving,,, any mess was just a necessary part of the work,,, its usually 2 men inside - 1 pushing the propane/elec/hi-cycle saw & the other holding the wet/dry vac wand while using a squeegee directing the swarf & slurry to the wand
 
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Old 08-09-14, 09:44 AM
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Thanks for all the suggestions and info, I have a concrete guy coming out this weekend to take a look. Whatever I decide to do I'll post some pics, should be interesting!
 
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Old 08-09-14, 10:43 AM
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asphaltic cold patch on conc d/w ? not the greatest idea imo - no strength & tar tracks all over the conc
 
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Old 08-09-14, 12:25 PM
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You can get exposed aggregate mixes in many areas. that photo looks similar to my patio.

I had a contractor friend/block customer put in a 12x16 patio. After the crew was job with minimal prep needed, they called for a "McDonalds" mix that was a standard available mix and it was delivered just as they tried to sit down for lunch.

Here, we have plenty of very sound rounded rock except over 1" or 1 1/2". The same mix is used for many different jobs here and I wanted 4000 psi with air. (I grill in the winter and sometimes use ice melters). The cost difference was minimal.

I had the patio replaced the next day with the same mix due to some strange happenings. - When man came the next morning to wash and scrub at 6:00AM, he realized something was wrong and could not was/brush it properly(bad retarder sprayed on). The first patio was torn out removed and and replacement in and done by 1:00 PM the same day.

If you have a good concrete supplier and ready access to aggregates, you can do many things and a last minute changes are not a problem. I don't think my friend (the owner/boss) even knew that he loaded in the wrong chemicals in the spray tank before he left for fishing in Alaska. The employees were treated as "family" and do what it takes.

Dick
 
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Old 08-10-14, 04:36 AM
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that's a great relationship to have !
 
 

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