Concrete threshold

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Old 10-08-14, 08:14 PM
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Concrete threshold

So I just got done installing an Andersen storm door on the front door, however the bottom of the storm door doesn't meet the threshold. There is about 3 inches that need to be filled so the storm door gets sealed at the bottom. The storm door can't go closer or the closers and handle will hit the door, that's just the downside of how these door frames are built. My question is, would it be the best option to just create a 3x4inch concrete threshold against the current one so the storm door gets a seal at the bottom? When the storm door closes you can see about a one inch gap between the door and door sill.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 08:58 PM
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I'd use a piece of treated 2 x 4. From the sounds of it, all you would need to do is rip 1/2" off the long side. Lot easier than mixing concrete, making and bracing a form and making sure the new 'crete bonds to the old.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 07:25 AM
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Isn't the door sweep adjustable?
 
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Old 10-09-14, 07:49 AM
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Pulpo, I think he's saying there is nothing BELOW the sweep, even when it's all the way down.

I'll never forget my first ever storm door job that my old boss sent me to-by myself- about 23 years ago. It was on a porch with an inswinging old wooden storm door and they wanted an additional self storing storm door on the outside. Instead of a 1" gap with nothing underneath the storm door sweep... it was more like 6"! What the heck was I supposed to do about that? LOL

We'd probably need a picture to be able to see what you're seeing. If the current threshold is concrete, then yes, that probably is what you need. But as Vic mentioned, getting the new and old concrete to bond will be the problem. Bonding agent as well as some "pins" to connect the two would be in order.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 08:41 AM
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Yeah there isn't anything below the sweep after it's adjusted all the way down. Here is a picture I took last night. What I would do is remove that metal threshold cover and put some concrete adhesive on before forming another threshold in front of it.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 09:02 AM
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If the sill nose has been capped with aluminum trim coil, yes, I would suggest you remove the cladding... but then do something similar to what Vic mentioned. Add a piece of lumber onto the front of your door sill (which is probably wood, judging by the looks of it) to extend the door sill out a little farther. You'd cut it to the exact size needed on a table saw (to match the slope and size of the existing door sill nosing) and then glue/screw it on.

At that point, it could then be painted or re-clad with aluminum trim coil. (that's usually something that's professionally done by siding guys and a metal brake). You don't use treated wood underneath aluminum trim coil though, that's a big no-no. Cedar would be a good choice as it's usually fairly clear and it paints nicely.

If the existing sill (the sloped part under the door) is wood, you DEFINITELY don't want to do this in concrete.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 09:11 AM
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Yeah the under the sill nose is concrete capped with an aluminum L cover.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 09:32 AM
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I'm not talking about what's "under" the sill nose. If the sill nose is wood, raise your storm door bottom expander up as high as it will go and add wood to the sill nose to extend it. Then lower the storm door bottom expander down onto the new extension.

If you are saying that what is exposed once you remove the aluminum cap from the sill nose is a concrete sill nose... then that's different.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 09:56 AM
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Yeah its all concrete, no wood. I've seen other storm doors around the subdivision with just a piece of cement board or wood under the door, but after looking at it they all seem like they are worn to hell. That's why I was wanting an extension made of concrete instead of wood
 
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