Fixing Stucco

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Old 11-11-14, 02:51 PM
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Fixing Stucco

I installed new windows awhile ago and had to remove brick faced stucco to get the old windows out. I had a stucco man come a few days ago to redo the stucco around the windows. It looks good but there is one section on the side of the window opening where the bricks are just not straight looking. It looks like they are angled in to meet the window. I want to fix it myself. I was thinking about buying premixed stucco and just adding some to the bricks to make them look straighter. Would this work? I can get pictures if need be.
 
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Old 11-11-14, 02:54 PM
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pics would be nice, that way we can see what you see - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 11-12-14, 09:29 AM
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I will snap a pic today, I guess my basic question is can I reshape new brick stucco with premixed stucco and will it actually look good.
 
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Old 11-12-14, 10:14 AM
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Faux brick is normally a 2 stage process, they apply the scratch coat and let it dry, then come back with a untinted coat of stucco with a tinted coat applied over it wet. They then 'draw' in the brick 'mortar' joints.
 
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Old 11-12-14, 05:52 PM
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How thick will the thickest part of the new material be?
What color is the brick and can you match the color?

Pictures will be very helpful -- different angles close ups and from far enough away to get the big picture.
What do you mean by premixed? In a bucket ready to spread or in a bag with all the ingredients then mix with water?
 
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Old 11-22-14, 09:33 AM
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Sorry for the delay, busy. But here is a pic. The brick just slants in to meet the window. It isn't a clean straight edge look and it looks like crap to me. The color is off but I told him I was going to paint the house anyways. He did 3 windows and this is the only one that looks so bad.
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Old 11-22-14, 09:52 AM
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So what are we seeing here? Is the corner here supposed to be 90 degrees and it is more acute than that? Do you want to build up the side closest to the window to get a straight line at the window and a straight 90 degree corner?
What process did. Your stucco contractor use to make th brick?

If this is donethewayI think it is it might e that order to get adequate thickness to do what he did head to are the corner that full. In other words maybe the framing was out that much and ignored to get enough thickness to cut the brick. Into the stucco it had to be that full. The head to tip it in to keep from burying the window.
Can you show us some other views?
 
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Old 11-22-14, 11:51 AM
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The angle is more obtuse instead of close to 90.
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Also before anyone questions it I requested a flat stucco sill because we plan on painting the sills white. Just a personal preference.
 
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Old 11-22-14, 12:55 PM
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OK get a good straight 1 X 6 and determine where you want the corner to be and screw through the face of the stucco and that will establish your corner. Now since you intend to paint ths and the color doesn't matter mix up some mortar pretty rich. Maybe 2 : 1 sand to cement if you use masonry cement or 2.5 : 1 if you use plastic cement. Some latex or acrylic like Acryl 60 by Thoro Products would be helpful. It will harden the mix a little quicker and make it stickier. Spread this on and grind it well into the stucco that is already there. Scared it off flush with the board you put up and texture it the way you want it. Then when the material is almost set carve the joints into it. I wish I could show you a picture of the cRving tool.. Get a stick about six inches long and as thick squRe as the mortar joints you want.get a piece of sheet metal as wide as the stick and abpxut three inches long and nail it to ths stick so it forms a U shape loop with the end of the loop about an inch from the end of the stick. Now you have your carving tool. Cut through her stucco as deep as you want your joints. When this is all done then when the mortar is hRd enough that it won't fall off the corner when you unscrew your board. Take off the board and carve the joints into the new work on the face side of the wall.
Timing is important you want he new material to get as tight as possible so you can carve it and so it doesn't fall off and still be green enough that you can carve the face that was hidden behind the board.
 
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Old 11-24-14, 09:59 AM
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I guess if too much time passes or if I look at a post on a different computer or for some other reason I can't edit the post above. You are not scaring the new material off flush with the board. The board is a screed and you are screeding the new material flush with it.
Somewhere there is a video on Youtube about making fake brick with stucco. It shows the procedure I described above. One video suggests using a wall tie for the metal part of the cutting tool. Wall ties are a bit easier to bend than some other sheet metal but that is both good and bad.
A piece of tin can would work too.
One other thing and that is maybe a very light coat of very light oil on the board that is your screed will help it release when you unscrew it. I suppose if you wait too long to take off that board and the new stucco is too hard to carve what is behind it that you could let it cure a bit more and use a grinder of an oscilating tool to carve out those joints.
Do you intend to paint the brick and the joints all the same color?
 
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