Best way to fill void behind bricks


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Old 12-21-14, 05:40 PM
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Question Best way to fill void behind bricks

Hello all,

I need to re-caulk the seam between my garage door trim and the adjacent bricks, so yesterday I was cleaning and prepping it. Whilst attempting to insert backer rod into the larger gaps, I discovered that the mortar up top was completely broken free. In my clumsiness I pushed it backward (away from the joint) and there is no way to get my fingers around it to pull it back in place.

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I decided it may be best to fill it in somehow, then smooth and paint it. (You can see above my harebrained attempt to fill it with small rocks.)

Rocks will probably not work that well - will need to remove those - but the question is, what do you think will be best for filling this void?

Options I have considered so far: styrofoam/cardboard/wood cut to size (may be difficult to secure in place) or Great Stuff expansive foam (which I can sand and paint).

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Old 12-21-14, 05:47 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Closeups sometimes put us in a warp. Are we looking up, down, right or left?? What happened to the trim board that was there running along that gap?
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:55 PM
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Hi chandler, thanks!

I apologize for the disorienting photos. This is looking upward at the top right corner of the garage door.

All the original trim is still in place. The void previously had a ~1" thick piece of mortar. In fact you can see what remains of the mortar toward the bottom center of the photos, with gray backer rod next to it.

Hopefully this clears things up
 
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Old 12-21-14, 06:03 PM
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I would install minimally expanding foam in the void, and install a 1x board using PL8X adhesive on the concrete to cover it all up. Do it fast enough and the foam will also help hold it together in the gap area.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 06:32 PM
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The jamb seems to be missing the brickmould trim that would normally completely cover that gap. Brickmould is 1 1/4" thick x 2" wide. You don't need to "fill the gap" with anything, you just need to COVER the gap.

I rarely disagree with Larry but IMO there is no need to use foam at all... and I would strongly try to dissuade you from using it. (don't come for me Larry!) I guarantee that if you try to foam it you will have a giant mess on your hands and then a year from now you will be asking how to get the orange foam residue off the stone. There needs to be a 3 day waiting period to purchase those cans of foam.


If standard brickmould isn't the right size (can't tell how wide the trim would need to be) I would rip trim on a table saw down to the size needed, plane and sand any rough edges that would be exposed, prepaint it, put it up (attach it through the face to the jamb), then caulk the edges. Once the caulk has cured, add one final topcoat of paint.
 
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Old 12-22-14, 04:34 AM
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Oh, I agree on the foam, as it is the last thing I use. I think the stone was placed in the hole as a filler to begin with, so they can come out or be left in place. I don't think a brick mold was incorporated there. Too skinny a paint profile on the framing. I was going by the shadow line of missing paint to say 1x lumber to cover the cmu partially and the crack. Don't know what was originally there, but something made the paint shadow.

How 'bout standing back and giving us a total picture of the door frame? That way Brant and I may agree on a solution that would be functional and look good, too.
 
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Old 12-22-14, 04:39 AM
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There needs to be a 3 day waiting period to purchase those cans of foam
I like that Expanding foam is great for a lot of things but it is very easy to make a mess with it and very difficult to clean up the mess. It's bad enough to have to scrape off what you can and try to disguise it with paint but to have to clean it off of unpainted substrates would really be a pain!

If your trim board isn't wide enough to cover the gap at the top, it shouldn't be a big deal to replace the mortar on that little section or even fill it with caulk - it may need a backer and/or several coats to keep it from falling out before it dries.
 
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Old 12-22-14, 03:28 PM
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i'd put some anchors in & cover it w/quit-set ceement,,, after that cures, seal w/sika's non sag polyurethane using a 1" plastic putty knife,,, it looks like you're structurally good but it just looks like ****
 
 

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