Can I Use wooden header (lintel) for concrete above my window?


  #1  
Old 12-31-14, 12:34 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Can I Use wooden header (lintel) for concrete above my window?

I am cutting out and installing a basement window where there is no window now.

The cement wall is about 9" thick, and i can cut out the window and leave some cement above the window. Online people talk about installing a metal lintel above as opposed to a wood header. It would be much simpler for me to install a treated wood header, is there any reason i need to have a metal one?

Its on the end wall of my house with 1 floor above it.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 12-31-14, 06:47 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 577
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
The first question is, how much concrete is going to be remaining above the window? How wide is the section is going to be removed and what kind of downforce is are exerted on this area by your home?
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-14, 07:20 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,194
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Besides being an IRC requirement, the main reason to use steel lintels instead of wooden beams is the fact that steel is considerably stronger and more durable than a wooden beam would be. Meaning for a given length, a steel angle would be more resistant to deflecting under wall loading from above and less likely to deteriorate (if given a decent coating of paint) than treated, painted wood would be. Even though it was a common practice here in the Pacific NW (about 60 or so years ago) to use wooden lintels in masonry walls, the foregoing reasons and modern building codes have pretty much precluded their use for same today. Another reason not to use wood would be difficulty in selling the property at a later date, presuming a buyer's home inspector notes in his/her report that your wood lintel is not code compliant.

FWIW, I suspect your wall is made of concrete and not cement. Cement (Portland cement) is a fluffy gray powder, available in bags or bulk, and is one of the components of concrete. By itself, Portland cement has very little strength.
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-15, 03:55 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
either steel angle iron or steel reinforced conc for a header - bdge's right ! someday you'll want to sell & you don't need to hear the bride's mouth when the sale goes south, do you ?
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-15, 03:46 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,194
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
"Steel Angle Iron"

While slightly redundant, that term doesn't make any sense. Steel angle and other shapes have been manufactured for more than 80 or 90 years, replacing iron angle (or angle iron, as some have chosen to call it). Adding carbon and other elements to pure iron produces steel, which is the universal work-horse building material used today. Iron by itself is both too soft and not strong enough to serve as a practical building material, and is why iron angle and other shapes are no longer commercially made.
 
  #6  
Old 01-04-15, 02:04 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
he got me damn it ! at least i've stopped calling it a ' hot water heater ',,, that should count for something, no ? wouldn't be the 1st time i've made no sense
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: