leveling AC unit cement pad


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Old 01-04-15, 04:59 PM
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leveling AC unit cement pad

I have a tree planted next to my AC unit and the tree roots are starting to lift up the cement pad the AC is installed on. The pad no longer level and the AC makes more noise when it's on.

I am planing to cut down that tree, and to relevel the cement pad, I would build a small wood box around it, and pour a 3-5" layer of cement on top of the existing pad. Would that hold?

Or do I need to remove the old pad and pour a new one in place?

Thanks for any tip
 
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Old 01-04-15, 06:46 PM
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howzabout, for now, using a lever/fulcrum & bricks to level it ? no need to replace the pad - just level it & tell the a/c its a NEW pad
 
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Old 01-04-15, 07:14 PM
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thanks stadry for your reply.

Did you mean to dig the dirt around the pad and insert bricks below it? What kind of level can I use for that? There is dirt all around it so I wonder what the level should rest on as well.

The pad is about 3"x2.5" and tilted about 5 degree max.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 07:47 PM
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5 deg. would not be enough to cause the unit to make noise.
Something else is going on.
There is no need to repore the pad, just pry it up and add some stone under it to get it level.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 09:13 PM
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That has to be one of the smallest AC pads in the world. Most that I've seen and owned are in the neighborhood of at least 3' square. And how did you determine the degree of tilt? Was it just a guess, or did you actually measure the angle, or even the total drop, and use trig functions (arcsine = total drop divided by total length of pad)?

P.S. I suspect your pad is made of concrete, not cement. Portland cement is a fluffy gray powder which has no strength by itself, but when combined with water, sand and rock, makes concrete.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 09:18 PM
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Bridgeman is right about the credibility of a 5% slope.

Most slopes are drastically over estimated. You will really have to hunt for a freeway over 7% in the U.S. This provides a measure of the slope in degrees.

Dick
 
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Old 01-05-15, 10:01 AM
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Thanks for your advise everyone.

I didn't measure the tilt angle. Just estimating by looking at it. The tilt is visible enough. I would said it's 0.5" lower on one side over a length of 3". That might be more than 5 degree after second thought.

I have to admit I don't know the difference between cement and concrete and was using the terms interchangeably. The pad looks just like my patio. I guess that is concrete.
 
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Old 01-05-15, 12:11 PM
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Inches and Feet

over a length of 3"
This says "over a length of 3 inches".

Did you mean 3 feet?
 
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Old 01-05-15, 02:44 PM
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A half-inch fall over 3" would result in a slope angle of not quite 10 degrees (9.6). If that same fall occurs over 3' (36") instead of 3", the slope angle would be a lot less, just 0.8 degree. That small an amount is not normally visible to an untrained eye.

If one wants to get to the point of being anal about angular accuracy, fractions of degrees can be expressed in minutes and seconds (not to be confused with units of time), resulting in the foregoing angles being 9 degrees, 35 minutes, 39 seconds and 0 degrees, 47 minutes, 45 seconds, respectively.

Expressed in amount of slope rate (%) as brought into the picture by concretemasonry's comment, the first scenario would be 16.67%, while the second would be just 1.39%.

But I have to ask--in your mind, what about your patio makes it "concrete," while your AC pad is "cement"? They are both composed of essentially the same materials.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 04:32 AM
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omg, bdge - all he needs is an f'n crowbar, 2 x 4, & a brick(s) or crushed stone, fergawdsake + calling a serviceman/woman/person to fix whatever's going on that shouldn't be,,, that angle's not enough to bother the unit's operation imo
 
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Old 01-06-15, 09:53 PM
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And exactly what is a "f'n crowbar"? Possible options that come to (my alleged) mind include:

1. foundation crowbar?
2. funding crowbar?
3. fracturing crowbar?
4. fiddling crowbar?
5. some other word I haven't thought of? Possibly a word frequently used on East Coast construction projects, but not elsewhere, such that most of us don't have a clue what you're talking about?

Please do tell.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 10:26 PM
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No Bridge...if he explains it, I'll have to delete it! lol
 
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Old 01-07-15, 12:54 AM
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then the definition will have to wait we do these all the time,,, takes a guy 5min - usually the aforementioned crowbar & a 5gal bkt of #57 stone $ 255.00, please !
 
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Old 01-07-15, 10:12 AM
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Wow! No wonder the rich are getting richer! Deducting the cost of the pail of rock, that leaves a $250 charge for 5 min. (1/12 of an hour) of work. That carries out to $3000 an hour!

No wonder you own so many houses and boats!
 
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Old 01-13-15, 04:00 AM
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also includes truck, mileage, trk ins, general biz liability, workmen's comp, completed operations ins, & travel time + cost of proj mgr inspection & report submittal,,, we also pay for the i-net svce thru which we get work rqsts + office from which pm's work

investment houses = hard work, paying attn to biz, + working 12hr days (80hr weeks) & wanting to keep our good men working when workload slows

understand this is all difficult for many to comprehend in toto as all they see is a boat, cars, & a couple nice houses,,, then again, imho, no one ever got ahead working 40hrs wk
 
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Old 01-13-15, 09:00 AM
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Stadry,

You forgot to add in the extra work people expect you to do even if it isn't in the contract, the money expenditures needed to try and recoup from people that have stiffed you, and court costs for small claims court.
 
 

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