paving driveway before building attached garage

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Old 03-04-15, 11:02 PM
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paving driveway before building attached garage

I just built my family a 2 story home in central New York and am looking to upgrade my gravel driveway. The driveway measures approximatly 180ft from the edge of the road to the back at which point i have an approximatly 32x32ft square for parking to the immediate left, next to our home. The current driveway is comprised of approx 2 inches of "soil" that was dropped and dozed, followed by aprox 4 inches of "crusher run" which was then dumped and back bladed to compact it. The crusher run seems rather coarse to me and it was never properly compacted which made for a terrible first year snow blowing. Because of this i am compelled to asphalt pave my driveway asap which is where several questions arise.

I am looking to install an asphalt driveway, and eventually build a 32x32 attached garage in the future. In a perfect world i would build the garage first, and then pave however i have been quoted at approx 30 thousand for the garage, whereas it is going to be between 6-7 thousand to just asphalt the whole thing parking area and all. I don't see myself affording 30 thousand for at least 5 years, and i definitly don't want to continue to have the driveway from hell come wintertime.

The garage door will be at a 90 degree from the road, so i'm not sure if i should just asphalt the 180ft straight and leave the 32x32 gravel. I don't imagine that asphalt would be an ideal choice for an attached garage would it? Also i believe my local codes stipulates that i have 4 ft below grade with footers for any attached structure, so i'm not even sure how or what my options would be. If i leave it unatached and include a small breezeway, could i hypothetically pour an exposed concrete pad and leave it in the elements for 5 years? Or would it be easiest to pave it all, and just dig up the new asphalt in 5 years when building the garage? Perhaps there are other alternatives i have overlooked?

This has been stressing me all winter, as i am trying to figure out how to make this work. Unfortunatly there is no way to move the garage construction ahead short of a lucky lottery ticket. Thanks for any and all suggestions!
 
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Old 03-05-15, 03:05 AM
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Welcome to the forums! The one drawback to paving at this time is the potential damage that will be caused by entering equipment to level and concrete your garage floor area. Of course if you are 5 years out, I would hate to run over gravel and clear it of snow for that length of time without the luxury of the pavement. Pave your driveway and turn around, but not the garage portion as it will not be paved. Build the garage and hope for the best care being taken by your contractors with the pavement. You can always insist they lay plywood over critical places, like turning points to minimize damage.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 06:25 AM
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I like the idea of pouring the pad with the correct footings before you do the driveway. Why will the entrance to the garage be perpendicular to the road?
 
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Old 03-05-15, 07:35 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions guys. The driveway entrance and straight away finishes into the right most portion of the 32x32 square parking area where the garage will be built eventually. The intended look for the garage is to look like part of the house, with the garage doors facing the neighbors house instead of the road. From the road you pull straight into the long straight section, then turn left to park next to the house on the 32x32 square.
 

Last edited by prime510; 03-05-15 at 07:38 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-05-15, 07:58 AM
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Is the aesthetics, of the garage looking like it's part of the house worth the loss of the practicality, of having a straight run? The only benefit of having the entrance facing the side is that you don't have to back out of the driveway. However, you could still make the driveway wide enough to make a U turn.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 08:26 AM
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No the driveway enters to the extreme right side of the parking area. Unless i extend more gravel to the left, its not centered. It would be impossible to drive out of the garage straight without seriously reworking more gravel and asphalt.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 09:13 AM
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Im sorry if ive done a poor job describing it. this house has aprox the same layout. My house is no where near as nice unfortunatly but its the closest I could find.

Google Image Result for http://www.visualtour.com/tours/2013/03158000/3158974/lp_nu0uv.jpg
 
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Old 03-05-15, 09:51 AM
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That's ok. It's not that you did a bad job. Sometimes it's hard to picture things.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 11:47 AM
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If you're five years away from building the garage then find out about laying and properly compacting new stone for a temporary drive. Snowblowing or plowing a gravel drive is not that bad if the blade is lifted about an inch. Not only will this give you time to save for a properly paved drive it will allow complete settling of the ground before laying the drive. You might also consider laying only the rough asphalt wait till later to put a top coat on it. Then any damage on the base layer can be fixed when ready to put top coat on.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 07:08 PM
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Thanks for all the assistance guys. I think i may just have some better quality crusher run added to the existing and have it compacted properly, and then put down 3-4 inches of binder. Hopefully it will survive without the topcoat for a few years. I just hate to top coat it and rip up a large portion of it.
 

Last edited by prime510; 03-05-15 at 07:43 PM.
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Old 03-05-15, 07:56 PM
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Good move under the circumstances.
 
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