Cracks in concrete pad - keep or replace w/asphalt?

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Old 03-11-15, 08:17 PM
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Cracks in concrete pad - keep or replace w/asphalt?

I am going to have my asphalt driveway and parking area redone (it's in bad shape - lots of settling, it's 20 yrs old and was not maintained well. The parking pad directly in front of my garage is concrete, but is developing cracks. I can either try to repair the cracks (and save some $) or tear it out and replace it with asphalt.

My thoughts:

1) Is the extent of cracking too much for a repair to be permanent? Whichever way I go, I want to avoid having to bring in heavy equipment once the new driveway is done. So if the concrete repair is not likely to be a permanent solution I would need to pour new concrete pad or replace it with asphalt.

which leads to...

2) Would asphalt be a good replacement? Is there any reason you all can think of to keep that area concrete? Aside from saving some $, I don't see any, but there's a lot I don't know.

Thanks

- I had to reduce the photo quality quite a bit so I could upload it...hope you can get a sense of what I am talking about...there's cracks similar to this on 3 of the 4 squares. -

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Old 03-11-15, 09:34 PM
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I'm sure Bridgeman will have an opinion on this, it's right up his alley! But from what I can see, and I'm by no means an expert on this sort of thing... the cracks in your concrete are from a lack of expansion joints... (the four roughly equal squares it broke up into are a dead giveaway that it needed to be cut anyway) it probably cracked soon after it was poured and other than a little expansion and contraction, they don't look uneven, so it appears the pads are stable. If that's the case with all 4 pads, I don't see why you would remove it OR repair it. If you want it all asphalt, you can certainly overlay asphalt over the concrete. It doesn't mean the cracks won't ever telegraph through the surface of the asphalt, but just like concrete, asphalt is going to crack somewhere.

Now if a fully loaded cement truck backed up into your driveway and caused it to crack... that's a different story... when a point load breaks concrete, that's usually a good reason to replace it. But the photo doesn't look that bad IMO.

Provided the additional height of your asphalt doesn't cause a drainage problem into your garage, I think it's a good solution. Drains can also be cut into the cement in front of the garage (trench drain) to help alleviate any drainage problems.
 
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Old 03-12-15, 09:30 AM
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Thanks for the reply XSleeper. I hadn't thought about cracking due to insufficient expansion joints. If they are all still stable and in good shape, wouldn't I want to seal up those cracks to prevent any worsening from freeze/thaw cycles. Drainage is definitely on my mind...don't think I would asphalt over the concrete, but maybe from an aesthetics point of view having all asphalt would be nicer...
 

Last edited by ATOM 93; 03-12-15 at 11:44 AM.
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Old 03-12-15, 11:44 AM
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So here's another question for you all - if it was your place, just for looks alone, would you keep the concrete or would you go all asphalt?
 
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Old 03-12-15, 01:01 PM
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Is there much freeze thaw in your area? Personally, for the extra money I would go with concrete! Reason being that there is much maintenance to asphalt pavement. But for both of the applications a solid base need to be in place before the final surface is installed. Proper drainage and slope are need to guarantee longevity. Other will be along to give their best expert opinions.
 
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Old 03-12-15, 03:32 PM
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Another factor to consider before you change that area to asphalt is what do you do in that area. Do you do any auto repairs of any type? Having the area concrete is much better if you do any auto repairs, jacks etc. are much more stable when resting on concrete and spilled oil will stain the concrete but not damage it.

I personally prefer the look and usability of concrete over asphalt but the decision is totally up to you. If you have a freeze thaw cycles in your area you deftly want to seal the cracks before next winter.
 
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Old 03-12-15, 04:54 PM
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I don't want to exaggerate how much freezing weather we get here, but we get down into the teens from time to time and have plenty of moisture. Money aside, I do like concrete over asphalt.

What would you use for sealing cracks?
 
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Old 03-16-15, 03:28 PM
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If it was mine, that concrete cracking would get sealed with high molecular weight methyl methacrylate. The really good stuff was 3-component, and mixed immediately before spreading. The lesser-quality stuff was just 2-component. Core samples I took from cracked concrete showed the 3-part stuff penetrating cracks down to just 0.003" wide--that's the thickness of a human hair.

I believe Sika still makes and sells the stuff.
 
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Old 03-22-15, 01:34 PM
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from what i read, sleep & bdge have it right,,, insufficient joint spacing/pattern is the culprit as conc likes to be square ( note the intersecting crk from the transverse 1 ? ) IF you decide to use hmw mma ( yep, sika's still selling it altho basj bought sika - there are other good mma mtls avail, too ), suggest a full-depth sawcut to totally separate the slabs & prevent a reoccurence of the existing issues
 
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