Failing retaining wall questions

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-14-15, 01:31 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Failing retaining wall questions

Hi Everyone!

So the winters have been really taking a toll on this retaining wall. As you can see it separates the front yard from the driveway. There is a large crack between the two that has been filled in a couple times, but continues to break and lean.

My questions are what would be the easiest way to deal with this? If it were just a simple retaining wall I would yank it, but because it is connected with the rest of the walkway, I would worry it would look odd. How much longer do you think this wall will last? What do you think would be the best way to deal with this cost wise? Any suggestions would be a huge help!

Name:  unnamed.jpg
Views: 1449
Size:  39.3 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-14-15, 02:29 PM
V
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Are there weep holes, or drainage pipes, anywhere alone the base of that wall ?

I used to have such a wall when I lived in Mass, and we had 1 3" or 4" pipe every 5 or 6 feet to allow excess water to vacate the ground behind the wall.

It looks like your problem is mainly that portion to the right of the stairs . . . . or are there sections that have heaved more than that ?

If it's just that small area, I would consider digging out the soil behind the wall and then excavating a few inches underneath the wall itself, perhaps using a garden hose, to see if I could encourage it to drop back into it's original position.

If you don't want to do the digging, maybe that would/could be a weekend project for some kids in the neighborhood ?

And if the concrete is still basically solid, you might find someone with the appropriate drilling mechanism to install weep holes belatedly. Those would prevent the buildup of water and ice behind the wall which obviously pushes the wall out when it freezes.

But if the rest of the wall is worse, then my idea may be moot.

A new wall wouldn't fit in as well as what you have now.
 
  #3  
Old 04-15-15, 04:05 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
doesn't look like a conc wall to me but cmu w/parge coat instead,,, i'd 1st do some digging where necessary behind the wall, push it back into proper position, remove the cap(s), & fill cells w/conc,,, reinstall caps.

proper drainage behind the wall would call for full excavation & retrofit along the full length,,, by the time 1 does that, i'd consider replacing the wall & do it right this time not difficult to design/engineer/build but very labor intensive

i'd also do it on a weekend IF 1 doesn't need permits/inspections/stamped drawings
 
  #4  
Old 04-15-15, 05:30 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,481
Received 599 Votes on 553 Posts
Seeing the concrete capping a large portion of the area which is also cracked and heaved or settling and multiple large cracks in the wall and stairs I would start saving money to re-do it properly.

The excavating behind the wall and trying to bring it back to vertical is an idea but you can only access the right side of the wall which doesn't help the steps or the left wall unless you remove the concrete slab above. None of this work will be quick or easy as you'll be moving tons (literally) of material and I think at best you'd get some temporary improvement. Since the wall is already cracked/broken and leaning it's footer is likely inadequate or compromised so eventually it will have to be redone and I would rather not go through all the hard work just to buy a few more years.
 
  #5  
Old 04-15-15, 07:12 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, much appreciated. The rest of the walkway is chippy, but nothing that would mean having to do it all over. That's why I was thinking eventually just removing that wall and leaving it sloped. I figured that would be my most inexpensive fix. Anybody have any idea how much longer the wall would hold? I know my parents and grandparents had walls like this that stayed sloped forever.

Also, do you think the tree could be effecting the wall/stairs?

Thanks again,
 
  #6  
Old 04-16-15, 05:04 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
i don't think that tree's bothering the wall a bit @ this time but may in a few years
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: