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Colored Stamped Concrete Driveway - Penetrating Sealer -- Your Recommendation

Colored Stamped Concrete Driveway - Penetrating Sealer -- Your Recommendation

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Old 05-20-15, 02:45 AM
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Question Colored Stamped Concrete Driveway - Penetrating Sealer -- Your Recommendation

Hi! I'd like to use a penetrating sealer on my outdoor colored stamped concrete driveway. I've done a search on this forum for possible similar questions but didnt find any.

I live in Canada and so we experience cold winters, deicers, freeze-thaw cycles. So a penetrating sealer seems mandatory. But oddly NO concrete pourer does it. So i decided to take it as a challenge to do it for myself -- and my concrete.

I am trying to figure out the best penetrating sealer for my type of driveway. I think i am pretty sure i should stay away from silane/siloxane blends and focus more on lithium silicate/silocate blends instead.

Would anyone recommend GhostShield 9500? Or Kryton T1/T2?

From what i read about Kryton's T1/T2 its a penetrating sealer but it crystalizes the pores entirely. While the silicate/siliconate fills the pores but still allows the concrete to breathe. I am still not sure why the driveway needs to breathe at all. Would make more sense to close off all pores which will prevent any water entering the concrete and stop delamination and other water issues entirely.

Secondly, because penetrating sealers dont typically have a "wet-look" i plan to use an acrylic solvent sealer as the topical sealer on top after the penetration sealer is put down (of course i'd wait 2 days+ for the penetration sealer to do its thing). Is that OK?

Thirdly, what about if i wanted to use a water-based stainer to change the color of my concrete...would i apply it after the penetration sealer? I figure because the stainer would not prevent any kind of blockage of the pores since it would be applied after the penetrating sealer...but if i did it after i am not sure if the siliconate (a larger molecule and more likely to be near the surface of the concrete) would prevent the staining agent from sticking to the slab on the surface properly

Janie
 
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Old 05-20-15, 04:44 AM
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But oddly NO concrete pourer does it
There is no reason, to seal concrete. Concrete is maintenance free plus it needs to breathe. Leave it that way. Moisture can do damage, if it gets passed the sealer & gets trapped. I'll never understand the obsession with sealers. That goes for decks too.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 05:29 AM
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It sounds like you are trying to achieve a wet look. Have you ever walked on stamped concrete that has been sealed to look wet when it's actually wet. It can be extremely slippery.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 11:31 AM
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There is no reason, to seal concrete. Concrete is maintenance free plus it needs to breathe. Leave it that way. Moisture can do damage, if it gets passed the sealer & gets trapped. I'll never understand the obsession with sealers. That goes for decks too.
Hmmm...Sealers are necessary to protect concrete. As long as one gets a breathable sealer then all is good). THe reason sealers are necessary is to prevent water soaking too far into the concrete and damaging the rebar (rust expands). Among other issues. Now compound that when living in a cold environment, prone to freeze-thaw cycles and you have a disaster in the waiting. Sealers are mandatory (to strength and preserve the life of the concrete). But again, sealers that allow breathing.

Now, penetrating sealers are the next level and help strength the concrete (but allow the concrete to still breath).

So in all there are two types of sealers: topical coatings and penetrating sealers. Together they should allow for a mighty tough concrete against the elements.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 11:34 AM
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It sounds like you are trying to achieve a wet look. Have you ever walked on stamped concrete that has been sealed to look wet when it's actually wet. It can be extremely slippery.
Yes i am already aware of solvent based sealers causing the wet look and that it can be extremely slippy (depending ont he gloss level)...however that is not what i was asking at all. Acrylic sealers (the ones that give the gloss) are for the surface. I am tralking about penetrating sealers that soak into the surface and leave the visual appearance matte and looking like it hasnt been sealed yet. I still do intend to apply a top coat (acrylic sealer) but just want more info no penetrating sealers (peoples recommendations)

And as a sidenote you can use sandy substances like Shark Grip in the topcoat acrylic to reduce/prevent slipping entirely. You'd apply it during your 2nd thin coat. Problem solved.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 12:33 PM
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Hmmm...Sealers are necessary to protect concrete. Sealers are mandatory (to strength and preserve the life of the concrete)
I don't agree with either of those statements. However, feel free to continue your search. Good luck.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 02:34 PM
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I don't agree with either of those statements. However, feel free to continue your search. Good luck.
Hi this is Janie again. Was forced to create an account here since this site's FB connect seems to be a hit/miss when i return (hasnt worked for last hour again so figured to just create this new account). Me thinks this site didn't incorporate it correctly.

Anyway, i'd love to hear your supporting evidence (detailed rationale with supporting links would be fantastic!) as to why sealers arent good. I am genuinely intrigued to learn something new. Would be very enlightening.

From all the reading i've done and understand about the chemical makeup of concrete and solvent-,water-based top coat sealers (acrylics) and penetrants (e.g. silane/siloxane, silicate/siliconate, etc) it seems suicidal not to use a sealer. The greatest enemy for concrete appears to be water (assuming the concrete used is good and was poured correctly including proper air entrainment) due to its porosity. I live in a cold environment that experiences freeze-thaw cycles and deicing (chloride) salt concerns which exasperates the problems.

I'd love to be wrong so i am eager to learn something new.

Thanks in advance
Janie Robyns
 

Last edited by kellogg9; 05-20-15 at 02:50 PM.
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Old 05-20-15, 09:34 PM
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Janie aka Kellog9, I'm originally from Brooklyn. That's part of New York City, otherwise known as The Concrete Jungle or one of them, anyway. There are miles & miles, of concrete none of which has any sealer. The concrete is way older than me (I'm 63) & will probably remain that way.

Here's the link to prove it.

NYC Smalltalk | Objects in the Concrete Jungle
 
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