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What kind of concrete do I use for this project? (Splash block + driveway curb)

What kind of concrete do I use for this project? (Splash block + driveway curb)

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  #1  
Old 06-02-15, 03:01 PM
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What kind of concrete do I use for this project? (Splash block + driveway curb)

Here's what I'm working with:

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What I want to do: Remove the current downspout extenders (buried underground) and instead create a concrete splash block/trough that extends all the way from that white downspout to the driveway. From there, I want to create a small curb (2-3"?) along that whole side of the driveway so that any water running down the driveway during heavy rains will continue past the house and stay away from the foundation.

My questions: What kind of concrete is best for this project, keeping in mind I'll have to form it to the style I want before it sets? Also, any tips on the best way to form/mold the wet concrete so that it has a smooth and clean finish? I want it to look good, including the side wall(s) on the splash block.

Any help would be very appreciated.

Edit: Also, do I need to prep the dirt underneath somehow? (I have no idea what I'm doing)
 
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Old 06-02-15, 04:09 PM
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Before you get to the concrete which would probably be Type S, is water entering the house the reason why do you want to remove the dry wells & reroute the downspouts?
 
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Old 06-02-15, 07:05 PM
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Type "S" concrete???? -

That is a new one that I not heard of. There is a Type S mortar, but that is used for use between masonry units, which is a totally different thing.

You can use a pre-bagged concrete mix like Sakrete or Handicrete. The higher strength levels would probably be more durable, especially if you anticipate a lot of salt being used.

Dick
 
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Old 06-02-15, 07:30 PM
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Sorry, type S mortar. I thought that was also used, in the mix. My mistake. I still question the need, to change the drainage.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 07:59 PM
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Reasoning: We live in southern Tennessee where there are heavy thunderstorms on a regular basis. Our house is on a sloped property. When we first moved in, the downspout in the picture simply emptied out next to that porch. The water would pool and run along the side of the house, which would seep into the crawlspace and also make the foundation damp.

My first solution was to run a series of downspout extenders down the length of the house to have the water empty past the foundation, and I buried these just below the surface. However, I'm just not confident in the longterm viability of it, and I still have a problem with the water that runs down the driveway running off against the foundation and (again) pooling up against the house.

So I figured I could knock two birds with one stone and take care of it all with a more permanent concrete solution. I decided it would be most efficient to create a nice trough from the downspout to the driveway and then create that curb along the length of it so that all running water from both the downspout and the driveway will be redirected down past the house without any problem. After I accomplish that, I plan to get some fill dirt and rehab that strip of dirt/grass along the house so that it's healthier and more level with the slope.

I'm always open to other solutions though. I'm a beginner at all of this and just kind of winging it.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 07:36 AM
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I understand the reasoning behind wanting to go with keeping the roof runoff above grade and sending it down the driveway, but one major drawback of such a plan would be the constant exposure of the curb to vehicle wheels impacting it and knocking things catty-wampus. You'll see best performance if you make the curb at least 6" wide, and taper it up from the driveway grade a few inches to form a transition instead of an abrupt jog. And yes, you'll need a good, compacted gravel base under the concrete, and will probably have to true up the edge of the asphalt (by sawcutting/removing) before setting your back curb forms.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 01:08 PM
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This is good advice. I will definitely do the compacted gravel base, that makes sense. I probably won't be able to edge up the asphalt due to lack of equipment, but it has a pretty clean/non-abrupt edge as it is, so I think I could work with it. Thanks for the insight, it definitely helps.
 
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