Cobblestone Wall

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Old 06-14-15, 04:07 PM
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Cobblestone Wall

Hi, I am contemplating using cobblestone to create a planter box in the front of my house. I searched pictures online and like the European look of it. My question is whether cobblestone is difficult to cut and what are the required tools? My home is on a sloped street and I want to be certain the cobblestone can be installed so that the top is parallel to my foundation rather than the slope of the street, as the latter wouldn't look at all professional. Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 06-14-15, 04:15 PM
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Cobblestones are usually not cut. They're set into the mortar whole. Cutting stone isn't very hard, it's essentially the same technique as cutting brick but without such clean results. Score with a diamond wheel, place a chisel in the score, whack with a hammer.
 
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Old 06-17-15, 10:36 PM
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Since the planter box is narrow someone suggested that we not make it a full planter, but use our house as a side to the planter by installing a water sealant. It sounded as if there is something you just paint on. Is there a particular water sealant that is a permanent solution? I want to be sure we aren't setting ourselves up for dry rot, or something where we would need to dig everything up in x number of years and install it again.
 
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Old 06-18-15, 05:34 AM
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You said "dry rot". That makes me think your house is wood. In that case I would NOT build the planter against the house and absolutely would not paint something on to let the house be the back of the planter. Even if you did a rock back for your planter I would want flashing between it and the wood of the house as a additional barrier to protect the wood.
 
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Old 06-18-15, 09:23 AM
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The building is stucco. I think I was confusing terminology when I said dry rot because we had professional painters who mentioned they would be checking for dry rot. (I guess they were referring to the frame of the house?) Attachedis a picture. We would be using the wall behind the junipers where we want to remove the junipers and plant beds. I have attached a picture Name:  Front of house.jpg
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Size:  51.0 KB Not sure if I have done this correctly a I am a newbie and still learning how to use the site. Thanking you in advance.
 
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