limestone paving not all flat

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  #1  
Old 07-13-15, 06:24 AM
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limestone paving not all flat

We had a contractor install these last year but some of the stones are not perfectly flat. It was sort of a rustic look anyway as it's limestone but the boss was away for a few days and told his workers to go to the local quarry and they obviously didn't 100% know which stones they were looking for.
So, I only noticed it recently but when walking across you hit some ups and downs in the walk way in the middle. Either end is fine as the more senior guy was there at the time.
I'm wondering if there is a way to chisel out the uneven surface and what could I use?






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Last edited by qwertyjjj; 07-13-15 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 07-14-15, 10:18 AM
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The only possible way to smooth that surface would be to use a diamond grinder like they used to flatten concrete surfaces. It's deftly not a DIY project and in most areas the grinders are not even available for rental.
 
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Old 07-14-15, 10:52 AM
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looks like a random rough hewed/split texture,,, IF you need a flat surface, chop out the mortar & relay them,,, obviously you'll also have to chop out some bedding mortar too,,, 2# stone hammer, brick chisel, rubber mallet - safety glasses of course
 
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Old 07-14-15, 11:34 AM
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Why diamond grinder rather than just chisel? To get it perfectly flat?
It's ok for it to be a bit rustic, but some areas need lowering.
 
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Old 07-14-15, 11:38 AM
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Can't relay them as they are too heavy for 2 people to pick up, they are quote thick.
The stuff in the middle is polymeric sand.
Underneath the rocks is just sand.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 09:22 AM
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Hit the high spots with a large (7") angle grinder and masonry cup. Live with the low spots.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 03:13 PM
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Why diamond grinder rather than just chisel? To get it perfectly flat?
It's ok for it to be a bit rustic, but some areas need lowering.
Limestone unlike some other types of sedimentary rocks it doesn't normally shear off in layers so trying to flatten it with a hammer and chisel could just make it worse. Even if it's ground it could still be left somewhat rustic but grinding would ensure that just the high points are taken down in more low points art formed.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 10:36 AM
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Hmm, I thought limestone was also used for sculpting? It does seem difficult to chisel it properly.

Like this? Diablo | Masonry Grinding Disc | Home Depot Canada

Won't that leave circular marks on the stone?
 
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Old 07-28-15, 01:39 PM
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Properly holding and orienting the angle grinder (while bearing down on it) shouldn't leave any circular marks. Going back and forth, perpendicular to the rotation of the masonry cup, and with only the "top" edge of the cup making contact with the stone, will leave just a minor amount of striations, and not much else. If a smoother, finished result is desired, there's always the option of using a cup with a finer degree of coarseness.
 
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Old 07-29-15, 07:58 AM
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Is it a cup like one of those double row ones or just a masonry disc?
 
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Old 07-29-15, 11:57 AM
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A cup is just that--a cup. Not a disc, although a disc might also work. The lips on the cups I bought from masonry supply places (many years ago) are quite thick, about an inch or so. Not sure you can find them at apron/vest stores.
 
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Old 07-29-15, 01:59 PM
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Old 07-29-15, 06:08 PM
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I've only used the steel-backed masonry cups, and they always worked well on concrete and stone. Wear a good dust mask, as grinding stone is messy work and hard on the lungs.

Never used (nor have even seen) the yellow, lumpy-looking thing.
 
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Old 08-02-15, 09:15 AM
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those things are carborundum & you need diamond - 4" grinder & turbo diamond wheel - 12segs will leave a more coarse finish than 24segs,,, you'll have to experiment to match the existing surface which, i imagine, is a sanded finish,,, modern plants use use diamond blades to saw limestone, others still use gang saws w/silicon carbide slurry, & still others are using wire & silicon carbide or carborundom slurry

after sawing, usually they get rubbed to remove saw marks
 
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Old 08-02-15, 01:25 PM
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i'm all wet are you certain that's limestone ? sure looks like split face common stone - failed to look @ the picture,,, if the yellow lumpy thing is what bdge means, that's a diamond cup wheel w/concentric segments - i wouldn't use it.

IF you can find an 'axing' chisel, that would be your best bet ( granite city tool - barre - vt - no $ interest ),,, other than that, 16pt bushing tool & chipping gun

apologies for the misinformation
 
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Old 08-04-15, 07:57 PM
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You mean a chipping hammer?
It's dark grey and has flakes on some sections. How can I yell if its limestone?

I ended up buying this but just realised it days Max 9000 rpm and my 5" angle grinder is at least 11500. Will it still work?
 
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Old 08-05-15, 04:57 AM
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You mean a chipping hammer?
It's dark grey and has flakes on some sections. How can I tell if its limestone?

I ended up buying this but just realised it days Max 9000 rpm and my 5" angle grinder is at least 11500. Will it still work?
http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B000...h_gw_p60_d1_i1
 
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Old 08-06-15, 11:06 AM
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Confused now... what's best a grinder or air hammer?
 
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Old 08-06-15, 11:55 AM
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If you don't own an air compressor, an air hammer won't do much good. Just get the masonry wheel/cup, screw it into your angle grinder, and grind away.
 
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Old 08-06-15, 07:49 PM
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Cup I have days 9000max whereas I think my 5" grinder is 12000. Might work anyway?
 
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