What to use to patched chipped out section of slab?

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Old 07-28-15, 11:24 AM
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What to use to patched chipped out section of slab?

Hi guys,

I had a hump in my basement floor due to it cracking during a drought that happened several years ago.

I ended up renting a jack hammer and chipping the hump out. I originally intended to chip out the whole section and pour new porltand cement, but it turns out that I didnt need to go all the way through. I chipped out an inch, 2 at the deepest spots, and now I want to double-check what I should be using to fill this hole because I've been getting conflicting suggestions.

Correct me if I am wrong, but I don't think portland cement is adhesive, and putting 1 or 2 inches feels like it would eventually flake off.

Someone else suggested using self levelling, and someone else suggested sand-cement, and someone else recommended quickrete "resurfacer''...

Would an expert kindly weigh-in here?

Thanks!
Nic
 
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Old 07-28-15, 01:53 PM
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Portland cement is not the proper material to use. It needs sand and rock to provide adequate strength. Go to a big-box store, and buy a brand-name (Quikrete, Sakrete, etc.) pre-mixed bag of concrete. Just adding water is all that's needed. For thin repairs like yours, Quikrete 5000 would work well, making sure to properly batch and place it. It already contains small rock, sand, Portland cement and a bonding agent. I've used it to set toilet flanges in concrete slab floors, in addition to partial and full-depth concrete repairs.

Hint: Since you'd only be using a small fraction of a bag, empty the entire bag into a mixing tub and mix it well with a shovel, dry, before making an appropriate-sized batch for your repair. Not doing the pre-mixing runs the risk of not getting a good distribution of all of the ingredients in your batch.
 
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Old 07-29-15, 07:46 AM
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Fantastic - Thanks alot Boss!

I just looked on the quickcrete site however, and it says quickcrete 5000 is made for jobs that are 2" thick or more. Would this cause a problem for me?
 
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Old 07-29-15, 12:04 PM
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Glad I could help, but I'm not your Boss.

I think Quikrete 5000 would work well for your repair. As I stated earlier, I've used it for all thicknesses of concrete placement, and never had a failure. I can't promise it will work for you, as there are many things during batching, mixing, placing and curing that a person can make mistakes doing (or failing to do).
 
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Old 07-30-15, 08:29 AM
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Ok thanks, not boss !
 
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Old 08-01-15, 01:50 PM
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IF you can find it, i'm liking cts in the blue box more than the other materials,,, we use 3/8" clean crushed stone to extend ( make it go farther ),,, pool trowel & squeegee for tools,,, as in any conc repair, prep is the key [no $ interest]
 
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Old 09-17-15, 11:37 AM
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I am not sure if you are still watching this (older) post, but I am going to do this job on Saturday, and I am hoping I can get a few answers from you (or anyone else).

Both of you talk about how preparation,batching, mixing, placing and curing is key when it comes to a concrete repair, so I was hoping I could score a few pointers off of you guys before making this happen.

I've settled on quikrete 5000.

I plan to empty the whole bag in a wheelbarrow and mix it with a shovel to ensure that everything is mixed evenly like Bridgeman suggested, and to thoroughly shop vac the area to remove as much as dust/sand/dirt/rocks as possible, but then:

-Should I mix it with a drill/mixer like we do with cement mortar? I've seen people just mix it with a shovel.

-Is it okay to use the flat side of the mortar trowel I use for ceramic?

-Is there a specific consistency I should be looking for?

-When it comes to curing, should I add a dehumidifier in the room or keep an eye on the temperature?

-Any else that should be taken into consideration?

Thanks fellas!
Nic
 
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Old 09-20-15, 04:50 AM
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std 80#bags of conc mix from the apron/vest store mixed in a wheelbarrow - approx 85b in allName:  CRAB A.jpg
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