Replacing rotten sill plate with concrete blocks

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Old 08-10-15, 01:48 PM
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Replacing rotten sill plate with concrete blocks

Hello,

The side of my garage has plywood siding that is essentially even with the dirt landscaping. Over the last 25ish plus years since it was redone the bottom of the plywood has rotten and so has portions of the sill plate. I am wondering if I could cut out the rotten wood and replace the sill plate with concrete blocks to raise the finished siding 8" or so off the current ground level so this doesn't happen again. If so, how do you connect the 2x4 wall framing to the now 8" wide block wall?

Thanks
 
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Old 08-10-15, 02:45 PM
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I wouldn't describe it as replacing the sill plate with concrete but I think you're thinking on the right track. Add a row of block on top of the existing to get it safely above grade. Then put a new pressure treated sill plate on top.
 
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Old 08-10-15, 02:51 PM
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Would I need to replace the 2x4 framing members with 2x6 or 2x8 in order for the new siding to be flush with the edge of the concrete block? Or could I just build up the siding with some plywood and siding to make it flush. Im assuming it would be a pressure treated 2x8 with a barrier against the concrete to act as the new sill plate correct?
 
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Old 08-10-15, 02:58 PM
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One of my biggest pet peezes's when I see things like what your dealing with.
Building class 101 would know better then to pore a slab that low, but I see it all the time.
Your on the right track.
Please post some pictures inside and out.
There may be an easier way, or at least we can see what your seeing to make suggestions on how to do it.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 01:58 PM
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Picture of water damaged garage

Here is a picture of the side of the garage.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 02:10 PM
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How about a view from the inside as well?
 
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Old 08-11-15, 02:11 PM
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The inside is drywalled, there is no water damage to the exposed drywall as of yet.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 02:50 PM
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Will you also have to replace the Garage Door with something 8" or a foot taller ?

Or lower the current one as the building rises ?
 
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Old 08-11-15, 02:54 PM
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Vermont hit on something I've been thinking about - are you raising the building or are you going to be cutting the studs inside?
 
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Old 08-11-15, 03:07 PM
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You can use either a 2x4 or 2x8 for your sill plate. Either way the block section of the wall is going to be wider than the wall above. That extra width usually goes on the inside as a step in the wall with the exterior wall flush. I prefer using a wider sill plate as it makes it easier to hit the anchor bolts but if you want to conceal them in the wall they'll probably be off to one side in the block anyhow.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 03:44 PM
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My plan is to shorten the studs the height of the blocks and sill plate. So the height of the garage won't be changing, just the bottom 8-10" or so.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 04:01 PM
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The way that was built it was bound to fail.
Really suck on that that type siding?
Are there joist in the ceiling so the walls can be supported while the outside walls are unsupported while this work is going on?
Siding and sheet rock, and studs needs to be cut and removed about 4' above the plate. If I was doing it I'd be using a doubled up beam made of 2 X 6's and at least 4 bottle jacks on the inside to lift the the outside wall just enough to take the pressure off of the bottom plate.
Row of block is added, holes drilled for 1/2" rebar in the voids every 4' and back filled with concrete.
8" foundation bolts added and back filled with concrete.
Pressure treated bottom plate.
Add new studs from old to the bottom plate. Using ACQ approved nails.
Sister new studs 6' long along side where the splice is.
Now your going to have to use Z molding up under the old and new siding.
If it was mine I'd get rid of all that old high maintaince, pain in the butt to restain siding.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 04:04 PM
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Good luck with that idea, Just not enough room to install new block, set a new sill plate on foundation bolts, add to and sister in new studs.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 08:38 PM
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There is a way to support the ceiling and wall from inside the garage, so I will be able to support the structure while I am completing this job.

I plan on redoing the siding completely. When I bought the house almost 2 years ago I knew I was going to be redoing this siding sooner then later, and have been looking at replacements. It was only recently that I started digging more into the project and found the sill plate to be rotting as well.

I am leaning towards a hardie plank lap siding, any thoughts on using the composite materials? Pros/cons/suggestions?

I appreciate the help/advice everyone. Thanks!
 
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Old 08-12-15, 05:04 AM
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I would start jacking that part of the building a week before planning on doing the work. I'd take it up an 1/8" a day. You'll need a little extra height to be able to set the block and get the sill plate in position. The lower the wall down on top and secure. More clearance makes working easier but you'll have to balance it against possible damage to the sheetrock.

I would do Hardie siding. I used to be a big fan of vinyl but I'm seeing too many problems with it on my rental houses so my current thing is Hardie.
 
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