repair or replace sloped concrete driveway

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Old 08-24-15, 07:17 AM
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repair or replace sloped concrete driveway

i'm pretty sure I know the answer but funds aren't there for replacement . so I need suggestions on DIY quick job just to try to make it through a while. this year it really opened up and the stones are continually on the driveway.

I guess it isn't bad for 60 years old though. but how much would this be?

but even if I did have the money, how will they access the sides to do their work? seems impossible. I really wouldn't mind if the driveway was 1 foot narrower on each side and grass or stones there to be honest. I leave all the leaves on the side of the driveway in winter because they are the ONLY thing that gives me enough traction to go down the side to spread salt after an ice storm

I just see so many challenges with a replace option even when I get the money

no idea why pics are sideways as they are fine when viewed on my machine but you can get the idea even sideways
 
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Old 08-24-15, 07:21 AM
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top level part of driveway in much better shape. I guess because I don't use as much salt on it
 
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Old 08-25-15, 07:00 AM
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I'm also looking for the answer to your question since I'm in a similar situation, but at a smaller scale. So far the product that might do the trick is Latex-ite Model # 1TPC Internet # 100077230 Store SKU # 805336 1 Gal. Trowel Patch being sold by HD. I would be interested to see what others have to offer. My job will probably require some re-leveling since i do get water to seat there for a while instead of running away to to pitch.
 
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Old 09-21-15, 12:09 PM
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I went to the big box store and looked at all they had. other than the true concrete you mix, which I realllllly don't want to do. they had a small 25 lb box or something that said it covered such a small area that with the 'gullies' I have, it would take many many boxes. I think I calculated one box would fill in 8 inches of my river in my driveway. I guess I should call a concrete guy to see how much a real repair would cost. if they can do it, but I dread it
 
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Old 09-22-15, 09:57 AM
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Quick and cheap is rarely the best solution to any concrete project. Over more than 40 years of dealing with concrete, I've seen literally dozens of such attempts that resulted in completely wasting a lot of $$$. I'd recommend waiting until you can afford to replace the driveway if its appearance bothers you that much.

You'd save a ton of $$$ by doing it all yourself, instead of paying someone else to do it.
 
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Old 09-22-15, 11:14 AM
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It is cheaper to diy but concrete finishers really earn their pay!
While it can be a diy job - it's not easy work.
 
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Old 09-22-15, 11:38 AM
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Your problem is the soil/base under the slabs and no surface repairs will not last more than a year or two of seasonal changes and weather.

Save you money and do it right a total tear-out and replacement of from the base up. Your base allowed the shifting and concentration to collect all the water and salt as it runs down into the open joints.

Since you have a driveway that is a deicing area/region, use air entrained concrete for the new slab since it will be the best bargain you ever got.

Dick
 
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Old 09-23-15, 06:41 AM
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I never expected anything I do to last forever but the amount of stones coming out drives me nuts with my tires. also I worry since this is all opened up now. that this year when I use my many many bags of salt that it will exponentially get worse. so I was hoping to patch and at least slow things. and I could never do a hill like this. I watched the guy pour my concrete pad for my hot tub so i'm sure I could do that now that I've seen it. but no way on a slope this steep.

and i'm scared to call someone but I guess something like this would be 10 to 15K at least. AND of course if I go to the expense and can get the loan. id go head and do the electrodes in the concrete to at least melt a tire path up the hill. im getting too old to snowblow and salt!
 
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Old 09-23-15, 07:33 AM
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does anyone know how they would actualy do this driveway? zero access from either side seems to make this almost impossible. no idea how they did it originally. stone walls on either side seem to pose a real problem here. especially on the one side where all my bushes are, they cannot even stand on the wall.
 
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Old 09-23-15, 11:30 AM
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They should be able to form up the sides, back the truck in and pour the concrete on they're way out. When there isn't room for that they usually use wheelbarrows or even a pumper truck if using wheelbarrows is deemed too much work.
 
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Old 09-23-15, 12:30 PM
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the cement-all's not the product for your d/w from what i can judge,,, get a contractor's price - it usually doesn't cost anything as most contractors are afraid to charge for estimates
 
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Old 09-23-15, 09:19 PM
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Based on the restrictions you've mentioned and shown in the pix: An experienced concrete guy would either pour 1/2 of the driveway at a time (with a longitudinal form down the middle), or go full width using false forms (removing them as he goes) where the wall/bushes prevent access from the sides. He'll also pour from the bottom up, instead of from the top down, to prevent the fluid mud from rolling down and creating voids. And forget the "electrodes in the concrete" idea to melt the snow and ice--not practical, and way too expensive to operate.

Since cost seems to be a big concern, you should consider going with asphalt instead of concrete. A lot less expensive, and the black surface melts snow and ice much faster than concrete does, as it absorbs heat from the sun. Meaning that you wouldn't have to spend a ton of $$$ on rock salt every winter, too.
 
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Old 09-24-15, 03:44 AM
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forget the "electrodes in the concrete" idea to melt the snow and ice--not practical, and way too expensive to operate.
I don't know much about them and they aren't commonplace in my area but I had a customer who had a steep driveway with it installed. When I came to give an interior painting estimate he was complaining that the system was only 3 yrs old and had already quit working. Apparently some shifting of the concrete had caused the system to become unplugged or shorted out ..... and breaking up the 3 yr old concrete was the only way to fix it.
 
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Old 09-24-15, 06:25 AM
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i did search a few more sites for guestimates and of course asphalt is a bunch cheaper. and i can say i wont be here in 20 years if i don't have a melting driveway so i really don't worry about longevity, just resale and maintenance. another issue is ill have to do the top then i guess. i cannot do my hill in asphalt and and have the top of the driveway be old concrete i guess. up top easily holds 4 cars for size estimate.

regarding the electrodes id have to see the cost and do more research. i leave early for work and its real PITA to get out there and clear it or else make sure is enough salt down so during the say when it does snow i can come back to melted driveway.

this gets zero sun on my hill so i really do need something to melt. it. i live on top of an iceberg as well. parts of my yard have snow for weeks after all else has melted, its weird.

regarding the forms and stuff. i guess they were good because i basically have just a few 'squares' of concrete if you notice in the pic. i think 4 on the hill.

--------------

fun fact: i have to leave all the leaves on the one side of the driveway so that i can walk down and put salt on the lower parts in winter. one year i totally cleaned the hill and i had NO traction at all in the ice to get to the lower part of the hill and i can only toss stuff so far. so now i learned to leave all the leaves there and they have saved me more than once. great traction to climb up and down in the bad weather.
 
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Old 09-29-15, 09:49 AM
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just curious..anyone have first hand pricing for a job of either material on their driveway?
 
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Old 09-29-15, 01:02 PM
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Prices from locations around the country will not be an accurate representation for what you will pay in Pennsylvania. Get estimates from local contractors.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 09:16 AM
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I live in Georgia, so hard freezes and ground heaving is a lot less common.

I do have a straight, 200 ft. long concrete driveway on a 30 degree grade.
It is 30 years old, and I finally had to do some work to it this summer.

The first thing that I wouldn't do is rip up perfectly good concrete just to replace it.

On your drive, I would use a pressure washer to remove all of the dirt, gravel and junk from between the cracks in the concrete.

I would then use some Muriatic acid and a acid resistant (polyethylene, polypropylene) broom to scrub each of the cracks.
Be very careful if you've never worked with Muriatic Acid....actually it is Hydrochloric acid and is very strong and reactive. Wear long sleeves, rubber gloves and a face shield when handling it. It also emits very strong fumes, so try to avoid those.
Read and follow the instructions thoroughly.

Use it at your own risk and if not comfortable using strong acid, hire it done.

The acid will clean the concrete thoroughly so that any new patch cement will adhere well.
I always pour about a quart of acid in a open, acid resistant bucket, dip the broom in the acid and then thoroughly work the acid into the crack. It will foam a little and turn yellow, but it is a good cleaner and etcher for concrete.
After it has been on the cracks for about 15 minutes, simply rinse the cracks with water, and let them dry thoroughly.

At that point, I used these two products to repair the holes and cracks in my drive.
I used the Quickrete Concrete Crack repair to fix the cracks around my expansion joints and any other small cracks in the drive.

Shop QUIKRETE 32-oz Acrylic Concrete Patch at Lowes.com.

If you're going to use this acrylic based crack sealer, be sure to do it only if rain is not in the forecast. It needs to dry for at least 2 days before getting wet....the longer the better. I used some playground sand to cover the repaired joints simply to prevent the tires on my car from picking it up when I drove over it... This is not a problem after it dries. This product remains pliable after it dries, so it is good for repairing expansion joints.


I used the Quickrete Quick Set Cement to repair any holes or big chips in the drive surface.
Put this on with a trowel and work it into the hole or chip thoroughly, then blend it in with the existing surface to make a nice smooth patch.
This stuff sets in about 5 minutes, but you can continue to add small amounts of water to keep it workable. This is 5000 psi concrete when it dries.
I bought it in the 20 lb. buckets and wound up using two buckets to repair all I needed. This is a good product.

Shop QUIKRETE Quick Setting 20-lb Gray Cement Mix at Lowes.com

Again, use any acid to clean the concrete at your own risk.

Shop Jasco Muriatic Acid at Lowes.com

My drive never gets any salt applied to it, and the winters are warmer, so what works for me may not work for you. I will tell you that after looking at your pictures, I would definitely repair that drive if it was mine. To simply say "rip it up and replace it" is silly and expensive in my opinion.
 
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Old 10-15-15, 03:16 PM
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wowza..first guy to actually come out for asphalt estimate said he wont measure unless i have 15 to 20K in my budget and maybe 25K. he estimated 5K just for destruction and haul away. still hell of a lot.

thats when i was looking at it and reminded myself that there's a patch job that was done before i moved in 20 years ago and hasnt changed a bit. wish i knew who did it and what it was. i just hope a concrete guy can come out and give opinion but contractors never return calls
 
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