Section of cinder blocks fell off foundations

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  #1  
Old 08-25-15, 09:13 AM
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Section of cinder blocks fell off foundations

Hi,

First time posting, thanks for all your help. Iím buying a very old house (180 years), but the fondation is more recent and made of hollow cinder blocks. The basement is not 100% waterproof (bad windows etc) and I donít mind if the repair is of a different color or what not, itís more of a cabin than a nice house.

The basement door was covered by a little shed which has a short wall of cinder blocks attached to the cinderblock foundation. There is a mound of earth around the shed higher than anywhere around the house, which pushed in its walls and broke off the corner of the foundation wall.

Iíd like to repair it. I see at least 2 possibilities, maybe you can tell me what would be best. Iím opened to anything.

First idea: I could chisel out the broken cinder blocks and install new ones from the inside of the basement. Potential problem: the bottom of the wall is underground and I canít work or apply mortar from the outside. Also, I donít know if it will all fit with the current door frame, itís pretty tight already. Iíll have to fix the shed walls eventually as well.

Second idea: Remove the shed walls, remove the mounds of earths around the foundation to make it more levelelled with the rest (keep enough slope for drainage, obviously). Build forms between door frame and rest of foundation wall and pour concrete

I attached a few pictures. Thanks!

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Size:  33.6 KBName:  outside shed.jpg
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P.S. The siding needs work done as well, I know!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-25-15, 09:24 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

The only way to correct a leaning block wall is to tear it down and start over. If that means excavating the exterior side - then you dig The wall starts with the proper footer which in your location is probably 4' below grade. Generally 12" block are used below grade for extra strength. Here in tenn we fill the hollow space of the block with concrete grout.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 11:10 AM
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While this is a DIY forum I'd have to call this sort of repair advanced or hire a pro. In many localities this level of repair requires permits and inspections. Then there is the enormity of moving so much dirt. Then dealing with concrete, blocks & mortar. Then since it's excavated it's a good time to install a proper perimeter drainage system and water proofing membrane on the walls.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 12:14 PM
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Judging by the drawing, is is very likely there is not a footing under the wall and the wall just rotated in one piece.

Look for major cracks in the piece of wall that moved to see if it moved in one piece and was not attached to a footing. It could an quick way to put in an access.

With old structures you often find some hidden problems.

Dick
 
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Old 08-26-15, 06:03 AM
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Thanks!

I've looked at other pictures and there must be a footing.

There is a lot of work to do on the house, as one might expect in an 1830s house that was not renovated much. We'll see if we can get help from someone with more experience.

There will be some machinery coming for the installation of a septic tank, we could add this excavation.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 03:52 PM
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You say you've "looked at other pictures"? Have you actually been to the house and inspected the foundation?
 
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Old 08-26-15, 07:38 PM
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Yes I have, it's my aunt's house. Sorry if that wasn't clear, my mother tongue isn't english.

Sorry, I did not pay attention to what was left attached to the slab/footing. I'll take a better look next time.

Both walls of the shed where pushed in. The left one pulled the corner of the foundation with it while the right one just broke without damaging the foundation wall.

The current plan is: Remove the shed and its walls, shovel out soil to clear a space all the way to the floor, place forms on the foundation wall and pour concrete. Then probably rebuild new walls to keep the soil from falling in, or excavate.
 
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Old 08-27-15, 10:38 AM
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Wow, regardless, the shed has to go. Take it down and have the people coming to excavate take it away for you (hopefully for free).
I believe the big concern, and the reason why someone here mentioned the word "inspected" it's because before doing anything to the foundation, you will have to make sure the structure in that area is sound. Otherwise, you take away a few cylinder blocks and the whole wall (and that part of the house) will come down on you. Also, typically, before removing any blocks, people often installed temporary support (lick columns). Search on youtube "temporary support beam installation". This is just to have an idea. For it to work, the professional would have to go under the house to install STRONG support beams, lift that area some and THEN remove of the cylinder blocks. There are many factors why this is not easy and simple. It requires a pro and experience.

The cheap way to do it would be to just put another "wall" with support beams to hold that area and it has to be tight.

Get a pro and estimates to do the job. Do a background check on the company you want to hire. You want to make sure the work being done will make that side of the house safer.
Oh, and if you invite me for dinner, please don't feel offended if I don't go inside the house :0)
 

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Old 08-27-15, 12:13 PM
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Alright, I'll take your advice and consult a pro.

Thanks everyone!
 
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