Decaying cement between brick wall and window

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Old 09-19-15, 01:57 PM
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Decaying cement between brick wall and window

My bathroom wall is currently down to studs, we are replacing the shower. There is a glass block window installed in the outer brick wall. When we demo'd the wall, my husband pulled out a lot of decaying cement from the window frame area that was stuck between the outer brick wall of the house and the inner layer of wall (the layer that is still on the outside of the studs.) What was the purpose of this cement? Does it need to be replaced? With what?

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-19-15, 03:28 PM
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Some wide angled pics would help a lot. It's hard to visualize where the cement was.
 
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Old 09-19-15, 05:05 PM
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Sorry, I keep trying, but the jpg. files will not upload. It came from a narrow area, about 1", between the brick exterior wall of the house and the outside of the stud framework that makes up the interior of the house. So when they built the house, they built a stud framework (with a full exterior wall), and then they built a sheath of bricks all around that. The cement came from the gap between them.
 
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Old 09-19-15, 05:15 PM
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When they build a brick fašade like that, a lot of mortar squeezes out behind the bricks. Some of it stays attached, a lot of it breaks into little loose pieces that just fall and get stuck between the back of the bricks and the wall sheathing. This sounds like what you describe, but pics would help.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 09-19-15, 05:16 PM
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Lisa, upload the pics to photobucket.com
 
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Old 09-19-15, 05:29 PM
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Shower Wall by lisa_dean1 | Photobucket

Hopefully this will do it.
 
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Old 09-19-15, 07:24 PM
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The pics made it. So there was cement between the frame & the glass block wall? It may have been there for some kind of support, although I don't know exactly what. What's more important is that you said that it was decaying. That would point, to water damage. Then the question would be did the water come from the shower or rain?
 
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Old 09-20-15, 04:01 AM
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It's more accurate to say it was in the crack of the wall next to the glass blocks - not between the glass blocks and the wall. As to the source of damage, well, it could be both - first, we are replacing the wall because the tiles were improperly installed and there was water damage to the wall from the shower. Second, we also (already) replaced/patched a good deal of the mortar holding the glass blocks window in the wall, since that mortar was decayed and cracking. Does the stuff that was inside the wall need to be replaced?
 
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Old 09-20-15, 06:32 AM
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Does the stuff that was inside the wall need to be replaced?
I just thought of something. It might have been cement board, in which case, you would hang it on the side of the frame that's faces inside the bathroom. It probably fell between the glass block & the wall as it weakened.
 
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