Replacing wood support with concrete


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Old 09-30-15, 05:28 AM
J
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Replacing wood support with concrete

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Would someone please recommend the best options for replacing 4 X 4 pressure treated supports fastened to good concrete footings? I don't need to replace to the top of the supports, just get out of the mud, snow, wet areas for the first couple of feet (last winter raised the bar). I feel comfortable working with wood but have very little understanding or experience with concrete.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 05:46 AM
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What's that post holding up? That's one tiny footing.
What harms it doing the way it is? That's a below grade rated post so the post should be fine the way it is.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 07:49 AM
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I agree with joecaption. That's a pressure treated 4 x 4 that's rated for ground contact. What is the problem?

I you really feel that you must do something, buy a 12" round cardboard concrete form (they are 48" long and can be bought at Lowes, Home Depot, etc) and cut a slot in the side so that it will fit around the post. Use some duct tape to re-install the piece of form that you cut out and then fill the form around the post with ready mix concrete (Sackrete....Quickrete).
Mix it really loose.
You can even slide some 1/4" rebar inside there too.

You can encase that treated post in concrete all the way to the top if you want.


Still, I don't see a problem with what you already have.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 10:01 AM
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Four of them hold up the front section of a Four Seasons sun room which works out to be the south side of our house. What bothers me is that one was replaced last year (the bottom 6" or so was very soft and in bad shape). I only discovered it because I was putting in a short retaining wall. I would like to build up the earth a little but would be pestered by the thought of them going the way of the one post. Maybe it was a one off as a 32' series of them under a deck (no footings) are fine. What is the expected life of such wood in the ground?

Thanks very much for your knowledgeable replies.

Jim
 
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Old 09-30-15, 09:54 PM
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A reasonable solution would be going the split Sonotube route as mentioned earlier, making them as high as you feel is needed to get above the (melting) snow line. As you're finishing the concrete, make sure to pour stiff enough to leave it about an inch higher near the wood than the outsides of the form. That way, you can slope the top surface away from the column in all directions, such that melting snow and rainwater aren't concentrated near the column. If a gap opens up adjacent to the column as the concrete cures (and shrinks), seal it with quality caulk to slow down any water infiltration.
 
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Old 10-01-15, 01:51 AM
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Split sonotubes, ready mix concrete and sloping it is.

Thanks everyone,
Jim
 
 

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