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Damaged garage floor


zemonti's Avatar
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10-25-15, 11:17 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Damaged garage floor

Does someone knows how to properly patch such a holes? What kind of surface is that?


 
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10-25-15, 09:42 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Some of the concrete experts should be along soon. My answer would be to saw cut the section & fill it with a concrete mix.

 
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10-26-15, 04:41 AM   #3 (permalink)  
Concrete mix?
The layer that is chipping out is smooth and less than 1/2" thick. I think that patch with concrete will make it worse.

 
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10-26-15, 05:23 AM   #4 (permalink)  
We have available a concrete based patching material called Top and Bond.
It works well and can fill thin voids.
You may be able to find a similar product where you are.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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10-26-15, 06:09 AM   #5 (permalink)  
zemonti, I didn't say patch it with concrete. I said saw cut first. If I were going to try to patch it, I would use a mortar mix with a bonding agent or the product that Greg mentioned.

 
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10-26-15, 03:19 PM   #6 (permalink)  
For me it seams like the surface is made by some different material. It's smooth and shiny. Cracking everywhere and chipping on few spots. How can i patch it SMOOTH? Not rough concrete-patc compounds.






 
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10-26-15, 03:34 PM   #7 (permalink)  
That floor has a clear concrete sealer that was applied AFTER the concrete had hardened for several weeks. You would have to apply a similar sealer after the patch has hardened.

 
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10-26-15, 03:36 PM   #8 (permalink)  
How slick the finish is depends on how the cement was applied. If you just pour it out and leave it - it will be rough but working it with a trowel will give a slicker finish.


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10-26-15, 03:40 PM   #9 (permalink)  
is it possible an overlay was placed on top of original floor it ?

 
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10-26-15, 03:47 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Just a thought, but it looks to me like the original surface was worked a bit too much. As you trowel and trowel the surface you push the larger stones (the aggregate) further down and bring the cement, water, and finer materials to the surface. This is how they get a smooth surface out of a concrete mix that is full of stones. But, if they work it too much, the surface is all fines and water not as durable.

I'm sure the concrete pros can clean up (or throw out) what I'm trying to say.

Bud

 
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10-27-15, 11:41 AM   #11 (permalink)  
As Bud said, the pix show what appears to be surface failure caused by overworking and/or too high a water-cement ratio. A simple patch job will do nothing to improve things, as there's just too much unsound and debonded concrete to (economically) repair. All of the questionable material should be removed and completely replaced, full-depth, with a new slab. A less extensive (and less expensive) alternative would be a thin-bonded concrete overlay, performed by someone familiar with the process.

 
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10-28-15, 04:42 AM   #12 (permalink)  
We have available a concrete based patching material called Top and Bond.
It works well and can fill thin voids.
You may be able to find a similar product where you are.


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10-28-15, 10:20 AM   #13 (permalink)  
never have seen this so uniform in thickness as a result of over-finishing tho,,, why i 1st thought overlay

 
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10-28-15, 12:48 PM   #14 (permalink)  
Agreed, that's way to even & way too big, for it to be an overfloat

 
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10-28-15, 06:27 PM   #15 (permalink)  
So to make a smooth and shiny patches I have to use patching compound and work it?

 
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10-28-15, 07:14 PM   #16 (permalink)  
Side note of no use other than to point out that this is a commercial parking garage from the picture, not a residential pour. So in many ways it probably is an over pour on top of a reinforced substructure.

 
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10-29-15, 04:48 AM   #17 (permalink)  
zemonti, your main concern is to use something that will bond. Forget about shiny. Going back to my original response, I would saw cut a square section about 2 to 3 inches deep & fill it with a concrete mix.

Is that the parking garage to an apartment building?

 
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10-29-15, 05:24 PM   #18 (permalink)  
Yes. The traffic isn't commercial. Few dozens passages per day. The chips are mainly in front of the door.

 
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10-29-15, 05:40 PM   #19 (permalink)  
I wouldn't try to match the rest of the floor. Strength is more important.

 
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11-04-15, 04:52 AM   #20 (permalink)  
Thank you guys.
It seams that I can't do proper, smooth patching.

 
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11-04-15, 05:14 AM   #21 (permalink)  
I agree with Greg, Top and Bond is the most inexpensive albeit temporary solution. I have a similar problem in my garage and I do a T & P about once every two years. It holds up to salt and water and freezing temps along with oil and gas spills.

 
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11-05-15, 04:54 AM   #22 (permalink)  
It seems you can do smooth temporary patching of your floor.

Youtube video on how to temporarily patch your floor.


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11-05-15, 05:08 AM   #23 (permalink)  
Great video Greg. It's exactly how I do it. Even the brush to blend in the patch.

 
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11-05-15, 11:13 AM   #24 (permalink)  
I'm sure there are similar products but I unsure what they would be.
Top and Bond is a highly unknown and underused product .

Even though it is a temporary repair product if properly applied sticks like heck and lasts a long time!


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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