Help with small drainage issue

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Old 11-02-15, 02:00 PM
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Help with small drainage issue

The new/old home I have recently purchased has a cold storage room attached to the side of the building. When it rains hard, water is entering from under the door, due to the ground being up to the height floor, and collecting on the concrete floor. There are some sections that will require repair from this.

First, though, I need to keep the water from entering and I thought I'd dig a trench outside the doorway and fill it with crushed stone...trap rock or something similar... to get the water to drain down before it can reach the floor.

Is this the best approach for an immediate fix for the time being and how deep and how wide from the door out is best to make this work?
 
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Old 11-02-15, 02:51 PM
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Unless you are just dealing with a small amount of water, I don't think your approach will solve the problem. The spaces between the stones will just fill up with water and you'll be back where you started.

You need to get the water to drain to somewhere. Is there a lower elevation area you can run a drain line to? Is there anyway to adjust the ground slope in the area so water runs away naturally? Are there downspout drains nearby you could run drain to?
 
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Old 11-03-15, 07:09 AM
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I assumed having a sort of stone "dry well" in front of the doorway would be enough to cause the water to fall away to a lower level faster than leaving it as dirt and grass... no?

My plan for the future... next Spring... is to regrade the area to do as you suggest, create a slope towards a lower level for drainage away from the building.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 07:23 AM
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Maybe, depends a lot on type of soil, degree of compaction, etc. But I guess it's not a lot of work to try it, maybe you'll get lucky. The larger the area and the deeper you go the better I suppose. I'd probably try to go down at least a foot.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 07:40 AM
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You make a good point about the soil. I had to dig a new hole this weekend for the rural mailbox. Moved it to the other side of the drive. I hit coffee colored clay at around 20".

I assume this is not the best for drainage, correct? That would mean the width of the dry well might need to be expanded out.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 12:32 PM
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Unless you enjoy working many unnecessary hours on a relatively simple project, why not do it right the first time? Either regrade the ground now, or install a large French drain with an outfall pipe running to a lower elevation.

P.S. Clay is impervious, and will never drain.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 01:15 PM
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Thank you for this suggestion. Just read an article and it makes sense to use the perforated pipe to move the water away from the foundation.

Will need to study the ground and see how far that pipe needs to run before it can "come up for air".

Question: Does the entire length of pipe need to be perforated or just the portion inside the French Drain system.
 
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Old 11-03-15, 05:59 PM
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I wouldn't use more perforated pipe than necessary to drain your area of concern. And wrapping it in filter fabric will help prevent loading it with fines, that can eventually clog it up.
 
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