Finishing touches for a 10" range hood exhaust vent?

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  #1  
Old 11-04-15, 02:58 PM
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Wink Finishing touches for a 10" range hood exhaust vent?

After moving into the new place, the first thing I had to do was to replace the existing range hood with a high-powered model suitable for heavy duty cooking and 6 hours + of use on a daily basis.

It has been a painful journey and after throwing out the first range hood due to shoddy performance and unstable mounting system, I finally found a Broan Elite EC6230TSSL model that has the power (1000 CFM) and quietness level for extended use (1.5 sones)

This entails enlarging the existing ventilation hole from a paltry 4 inch to whopping 10 inch which was tough and arduous. The exhaust vent is on the second floor about 20 ft off the ground and operating rotary hammer drill from that height without safety harness or stable platform is a recipe for disaster. So I had to get creative, don ear protection, mask, goggles and climb inside the wooden canopy and drill from inside out.

When installing the exterior vent, I deliberately took advantage of the long ductwork and had it extend outwards from the wall. I've seen lots of range hood vents that sit flush against the wall but after a few years of use the bricks become stained and darkened by cooking grease. Now the question is how do I add the finishing touches to the exterior vent and make it look aesthetically pleasing and hide the insulating foams?

I had a few ideas such as:
- Go to a metal fabricator and custom make a rectangular stainless steel frame
- Use plywood and build a mold around the vent, and then pour in concrete (might be messy)
- Go to a stone mason and have him/her cut out two pieces of stone that will fit into the extended space and mount it on the bricks

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  #2  
Old 11-04-15, 03:50 PM
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I would mount the vent hood flush against the wall as it's intended. Then have a metal deflector below to divert the exhaust away from the wall to prevent staining.
 
  #3  
Old 11-04-15, 04:40 PM
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I agree with Dane and I would definitely put it flush with the wall. If you want to leave it protruding like you did I would either go with the stone or metal ideas you put in your 1st post. I think the concrete idea would be messy and prone to failure.

I believe that according to code when you have an exhaust fan that large you must also have a makeup air supply into the kitchen. Did you install one when you did this project?
 
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Old 11-04-15, 04:46 PM
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Had you asked ahead of time I would have recommended a split system where the exhaust motor is outside. That hood is designed to blow the grease away from the building and the biggest plus is no noise inside as the motor unit is outside.

I have to agree with keeping the hood tight to the wall and using an additional deflector plate
 
  #5  
Old 11-04-15, 06:36 PM
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Here's another vote for mounting the outlet end flush with the brick. For commercial-level duty like you're proposing, you shouldn't have much trouble finding an efficient filter system for trapping grease. Preferably one located in the kitchen, adjacent to the hood, where it's a simple matter of keeping things clean.
 
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Old 11-05-15, 08:54 AM
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Hi all - thank you so much for the fast and helpful replies! Mounting the vent flush against the wall now involves cutting the protruding ductwork and the vent since they are manufactured in one piece. It is really nice stainless steel vent from Heavy Duty Metal Vents in Copper, Stainless and Galvanized by Luxury Metals and I really want to keep it in one piece

Maybe I'll have to go with the stone idea..
 
  #7  
Old 11-05-15, 09:08 AM
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I agree with Msradell, you may want to take a look at a make-up air system if you don't have one. You may find you don't get as much exhaust as designed because it's creating a negative pressure in the room. It could also cause a nasty problem with gas-fired equipment like water heaters or furnaces not drawing properly and putting carbon monoxide into the space. At the very least I would suggest cracking a window.
 
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Old 11-05-15, 09:35 AM
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Thanks for raising the issue of make-up air when using high CFM hood. There are no strict code requirements in Ontario (Canada) but my kitchen shares an open concept space with the living room, totaling to about 2500 square feet (house is 5500 square feet) so I will seldomly run into negative pressure issue. The range hood operates mostly in the 400 to 600 CFM range and it is rarely used at the max power of 1000 CFM.

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  #9  
Old 11-05-15, 11:03 AM
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The volume of the house only affects how quickly the negative pressure stabilizes, which would be within one minute at speeds over 400 cfm. I know you don't want to hear it, but just because the mfg is silent on the make-up air requirements (that helps their sales) it doesn't mean there isn't a serious potential problem. Your home certainly doesn't look like a leaky log cabin so expecting the house to supply anywhere near that volume isn't going to happen.

The key questions are, do you have a naturally drafted (as opposed to sealed combustion) furnace/boiler or water heater? If yes, then you need to provide an approved make-up air system. Here's Martins explanation.

Makeup Air for Range Hoods | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Bud
 
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Old 11-05-15, 12:05 PM
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Bud - thanks for the reply and I agree, the requirement of make-up air is never properly stated on the manual but I have to give credit to Broan for at least including a warning in the manual. My furnace is York Affinity YP9C and the water heater is a standard issue from the gas company. Both equipment have intake and exhaust that is connected to the side of the house, far away from the range hood:



Do you think I will run into any issues for this upcoming winter?
 
  #11  
Old 11-05-15, 12:34 PM
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Perfect, as long as you don't light the wood stove .
"Do you think I will run into any issues for this upcoming winter? " In regards to the exhaust, a rough estimate at mid speed shows you will be replacing all of the air inside the house every hour. Dry winter air could become an issue.

In regards to the sealed combustion intake and exhaust, just make sure they don't get blocked with snow. We lost a couple of people down here last winter when the exhaust got blocked.

Bud
 
  #12  
Old 11-05-15, 04:41 PM
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Carbon monoxide--the silent (but very effective) killer.
 
  #13  
Old 11-05-15, 05:29 PM
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As others have said the volume of your house doesn't matter, what matters is how much air leakage you have into it and I highly doubt you have anywhere near the leakage that is going to be required for that fan even when it's on the midrange setting. The fact that both your furnace and water heater both have external fresh air intakes and separate exhausts will certainly help them remain efficient and probably prevent CO from getting into your living space it won't help provide makeup air. You be much better off installing a makeup air vent with a heat exchanger now instead of when it causes problems later.
 
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