Cleaning up dryer vent exhaust hole

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-04-15, 05:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cleaning up dryer vent exhaust hole

So youve seen my threads around alot lately youll see in the pics that rhe old exhaust cover has no barier to stop bugs from getting into the lines. I took the cover off and noticed a few issues of concern. Obviously the first thing is that there is not a perfect circle. What do I need to fix this I hace a pretty powerful drill do I ust get a 4in circle thing? Also it appears the vent pipe is not all the way out. Do i need some sort of connection to extend it?






Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-04-15, 06:11 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,608
Received 339 Votes on 317 Posts
A dryer duct should be a 4" metal line. That looks like a smaller diameter PVC pipe in the picture.

A regular dryer hood comes with an attachment pipe.

Name:  hood.jpg
Views: 1241
Size:  8.1 KB

In order to make that hole larger you'll need a sharp chisel and small sledge hammer.
The hole size will be almost 4-3/4" so a 4" hole saw will be of no help there.
 
  #3  
Old 12-04-15, 07:03 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the existing line is indeed PVC pipe, you are very lucky that the stuff hasn't caught fire yet and burned the house down.

Replace all of it, with metal, asap. Your homeowners insurance company will thank you.
 
  #4  
Old 12-04-15, 07:25 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
I think what he's got is metal... it's probably 3" and is flared on the very end. So covered in lint he probably can't tell what it is.

I would suggest you get a small diameter masonry bit, put it in a hammer drill and make a series of holes around the perimeter to clean up the opening and make it more round. The dryer vents in the pics above usually come with a sleeve that can be siliconed onto the exterior to seal up the hole.
 
  #5  
Old 12-04-15, 08:13 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
When its daylight out ill go out and double check that its not pvc.. what type if cost am I looking at if i had to replace everything? Is tge a multiple thousands or hundreds can I do it myself?

By smaller diameter masonry could you suggest a size? Im envisioning you mean just drill numerous holes vlose together then i can break away tge bits? Sort of like carving a pumpkin
 
  #6  
Old 12-04-15, 08:36 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
Oh, like a 1/8 or 5/32" masonry bit. And yes, connect the dots. Once you drill a series of holes, one smack from a hammer and cold chisel should open it up. A 4 1/8" hole is the perfect diameter if you wanted to make a template to draw an outline.
 
  #7  
Old 12-04-15, 08:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ow im worried these hpuses were all uilt in the 80s i live in a townhouse with a few next to me all thw same.. doesnt make me feel saf if this in fact pvc. I got a linteater the other day to clear out the lint from thw ducts will be interesti g. Just bought back in April
 
  #8  
Old 12-05-15, 04:08 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Cost of replacing pipe is strictly related as to how hard it is to access. If easy to see and get to no problem and easy do it yourself, If behind walls and no access than can be very expensive. Dryer vents that are not working properly cause most dryer problems and dryer fires.
 
  #9  
Old 12-05-15, 08:59 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well this wasnt what i wanted to see im very convinced its pvc on the exhaust. When did they do pvc for these things? Im wondering how far pack it goes onto the system or if its pvc the whole way.

So i bought a "lint eater" to clean out the exhaust but im wondering now if im better off leavong it because I wonder if the lint lining the piping is better then having it all the normal outside again.



All I know is ots right there on the other sode of this wall is my kitchen then the dryer is on the second floor
 
  #10  
Old 12-05-15, 11:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts




So more updates. Here are pictures from the dryer side I cant tell if its all plastic after this sleeve but I see enough. To worry me. So any videos or step by step guides to go at this myself?

In the meantime whats the thought here should I clear all lint out with the linteater? One one hand I feel the "layer" of built up dryer lint may suppress the buildup of static electricity, but the other hand if i clear the vent out thereay be kore surface area to build up a charge but less lint to catch fire.

Last consideration as mentioned all the hoisesnin my row likely have this issue is there some building code in FL i may be able to or something I could bring to HOA or even try to bring up to building code. Ideally It may be something to make the other owners act on it (most of these units are rentals.
 
  #11  
Old 12-05-15, 11:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Also assuming it doesnt make much difference but the connection from the dryer to the wall is the foil type connection
 
  #12  
Old 12-05-15, 11:41 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Clean the lint it's not doing anything but causing problems. Lint is what burns not the pipe. If worried about PVC pipe check with your building dept says about PVC for vent pipe. I think the plastic you would be worried about is the old flexible plastic they had 30 years ago. The PVC would not be my choice for pipe but since it is there could be a major expense to change.
 
  #13  
Old 12-05-15, 12:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How can I be sure this isnt the flexible pipe. The house was built around the 80s so it may fit the bill. I realize the lint is what causes the issue but isnt it also the concern of static electricity causong a spark?

I guess i just call up my code enforcement office to see if its up to code?
 
  #14  
Old 12-05-15, 03:04 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
Wow, that surprises me. A duct cleaning firm should be able to send a brush down that pipe and clean it up. To me, that's most important. PVC is not what you want to see... current code says "metal" but who knows what code allowed when it was built. And you aren't required to bring it up to code unless you change something major, like tear off that part of the house during a remodel. I would not call anyone and leave sleeping dogs lie!

Oh, and here is a link from this site about it.

Using a Dryer Vent Made out of PVC | DoItYourself.com
 
  #15  
Old 12-05-15, 03:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
At this point im super worried about the fire hazard not even really a concern about code.

I have the gear to clean the lines hust making sure its a smart idea to do it or not being that the bare walls of pvc will produce greater static electricity
 
  #16  
Old 12-05-15, 08:55 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
From what I can see you have solid PVC pipe for vent. Never have seen any problem with that for a vent, Don't know what your code is now. The flexible tube I was talking about Looks like a spring is in the plastic and is very noticeable. Hard PVC is not the problem it is lint build up.
 
  #17  
Old 12-05-15, 11:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Diego
Posts: 69
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In actuality the corrugated flexible pipe, which you would typically attach from stub -out to dryer, is far more likely to trap lint than the smooth-walled plastic. Keeping the whole length of discharge pipe lint-free is far more important than your concerns about plastic pipe.

Minimizing any lint getting into the vent in the first place, is just a matter of conscientiously cleaning out the lint trap on the dryer before each load. And occasionally, depending upon use, disconnecting the connection at the dryer and vacuuming the vent.

As long as the warm discharged air has an unobstructed outlet and lint build up is prevented, any concerns about the plastic pipe is largely unfounded.
 
  #18  
Old 12-06-15, 06:10 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
the bare walls of pvc will produce greater static electricity
Um, I don't think the danger is from static electricity. LOL

Today's IRC code states that the duct should be metal because of the fire hazard... if a fire starts in the duct, the metal won't burn.
 
  #19  
Old 12-06-15, 06:46 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This is the California Mechanical Code but it's pretty much based on the UMC.

Section 504.3.1 Dryer venting shall terminate on the exterior of the building and will have a back draft damper (flapper). Screens shall not be permitted or installed at the dryer vent termination.
Clothes dryer vent pipes shall not pass through or extend into other ducting or plenums.
Dryer ducting shall not be fastened with screw type fasteners which may impede the air flow or catch lint, yet must be fastened and sealed “substantially airtight” at each joint. (An approved fastening system is aluminum duct tape)
Section 504.3.2 A minimum of a 4-inch diameter duct is required.
Section 504.3.2.1 Clothes dryer vent ducts shall be metal and shall have a smooth interior surface.
An approved “flexible duct connector” of not more than 6 feet in length may be used to connect the dryer to the dryer vent pipe. “Flexible duct connectors shall not be concealed within the construction.” (Flex duct connectors shall not pass into or through a concealed space. This includes cabinets, walls and attic spaces).
Section 504.3.2.2 A dryer vent duct shall not exceed the maximum length (horizontal and/or vertical) of 14 feet including two (90-degree) turns without a mechanical upgrade. Two feet of length shall be deducted for each additional 90-degree turn.

I just scanned over the posts, it looks like some good recommendations are cleaning the PVC, install the wall cap with damper, and then keep the dryer lint screen and internal ductwork clean. Below is a picture of a vent brush.

Name:  ventbrush.jpg
Views: 1073
Size:  20.9 KB
 
  #20  
Old 12-06-15, 09:51 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
As I said don't think vent would be a problem but for peace of mind I would talk to rest of town house owners with your concerns. Get a price from a duct cleaning company for a package deal. If yours looks like that I bet the rest need cleaning, Would try for a yearly contract.
 
  #21  
Old 12-07-15, 05:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys i feel a bit better now reading up on it I guess there are millions of homes out there with the exhaust system made of PVC.

My apologies for my confusion I thought the main concern with pvc is the static electricity building up and causing a fire inside the pipes. It seems by the time the heat travels through the foil looking springy hose the heat may have "cooled off" to the point the plastic venting system inside my walls is not as much of a concern.

I have the lintbrush system that hools up to the vacuum and I will be doing my system soon. If its fairly easy I may just offer to do it for my neighbors for peice of mind that thats one less fire hazard to worry about (especially effecting my unit lol ).

Regarding my original inquiry as was suggested here im getting a mason drill bit and rounding out the circle and I will go ahead and fit some sort of pipe or adapter from the 3' pvc to my 4' circle exhaust flapper thingy to keep critters out.

Ill update if any new information comes to light. Thanks everyone!
 
  #22  
Old 12-21-15, 04:26 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well cleaned out the whole exhaust line with a vaccuum and the brush thing. Then I cleaned ou the lint trap area on the dryer. Will post pics of the lint i got our of there but now i got a bigger issue. If you turn the dryer on now it doesnt seem to heat up anymore wondering if something came loose it also seems to not countdown anymore so if you set it for 10 minutes it wont move from the 10 minutes spot at all. Ill be taking the bacl off tonight when i get home. Hoping the 2 issues are related. The blower definitely still works and the tumbler or spinner part works.
 
  #23  
Old 12-21-15, 05:08 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
pOST MAKE AND MODEL # OF DRYER AND WE CAN HELP. Sorry dam cap lock key
 
  #24  
Old 12-21-15, 09:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here is what my roommate says the label saod

Its a inglis by whirlpool
120/208v 23A 60Hz
120/240v 26A 60Hz
3 or 4 wire connection

Type: D433-ELE-2406028-FM54

MOD: IEX3000RQ0
SER: MS3410223

Also bacl to my original inquiry, any idea what diameter im likely working woth on the PVC. I need some sort of adapter that goes from that pvc pipe to the 4' diameter plastic exhaust "backdraft cover" to help keep critters put of the line
 

Last edited by GoUSF; 12-21-15 at 09:42 AM.
  #25  
Old 12-21-15, 09:42 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 52
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Run the Air-Dry mode - do you have decent flow of air coming out the exhaust. If not, disconnect it at the dryer & check if that has decent air flow. If it's good coming out the dryer but poor at the exhaust vent, make sure everything's sealed up, and that there's no clogs within the pipe.

FYI: here is a link to your owner's manual
 
  #26  
Old 12-21-15, 09:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yup ran it a few times and the air is definitely coming out of the exhaust but its not hot at all. And the clothes inside the dryer show no signs of heat even after 20 minutes
 
  #27  
Old 12-21-15, 09:51 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
Either the thermal fuse has blown, or the heating element is probably shot.
 
  #28  
Old 12-21-15, 09:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hopefully not are those expensive to fix? Im hoping its just something that came loose while I moved the dryer in and put of the wall area to clean out all the vents.
 
  #29  
Old 12-21-15, 10:07 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 52
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Someone who knows dryers can help better than me, but just from a DIY perspective, make sure everything is the way it was before you started. I've cleaned my dryer exhaust out many times with a vacuum, making sure not to kink the gas line or any electrical connections, and making sure the duct is securely back on the dryer when I'm done.

Do you even hear gas flowing into the dryer a couple seconds after it starts? Did you maybe turn on the shutoff valve to the gas before doing anything?
 
  #30  
Old 12-21-15, 11:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Its an electric dryer so no gas to speak of. The only thing I did different when i putthe dryer back was fixed the shiny hose that goes from the dryer to the start of the exhaust system so it wasnt all tangled up.

Thanks for the suggestions so far everyone!
 
  #31  
Old 12-21-15, 01:18 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Will need a meter for this.
1st you need to check you have 240 volts to back of dryer. Unplug dryer And take back off. Check heater element and upper thermostat for continuity. (no opens) Either one open it's bad.
 
  #32  
Old 12-21-15, 05:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I will need to go purchase a meter but why would moving the dryer away from the wall to access the exhaust system have affect the wall outlet ?
 
  #33  
Old 12-21-15, 05:52 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 192 Votes on 179 Posts
why would moving the dryer away from the wall to access the exhaust system have affect the wall outlet ?
Why did you start working on the dryer in the first place.... was the dryer not drying clothes? If so, its probably because the heating element was burnt out or it got hot and threw the thermal switch.

You are setting the dryer control on a heated setting, right? Got to ask, since some have settings that just blow cool air.
 
  #34  
Old 12-21-15, 07:00 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts



I took a pic of the housing of the element in case that helps anyone out. It may be hard to see but right below the orange wire across from the res wore there is nothing in that plug. I looked all over and saw no wore i could connect to this however.

How can I rule out the thermal switch vs the heating element? Any sort of ballpark on the cost to replace each and level of difficulty to replace?


The reason it was moved out from the wall was because the original intent of this post was to determine how i go about putting my new exhaust cover on because the hole was not totally 4 inches in diameter. At this point it was brought to my attention i had a pvc exhaust system that is a fire hazard and wjile not 100% foolproof cleaning put the exhaust system should give some peace of mind. At that point my primary concer shifted from installing the new cap to keep bugs and such put of the line to clearing the lint out. The dryer ran before but took abut 1.5-2 full cycles to dry however so i dont know ot worked fine when i reonstalled it last week before i cleaned all the lint and it still worked fine.

Fingers crossed this wont be a huge repair
 
  #35  
Old 12-21-15, 07:32 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
After talking with my wife apparently shes been displeased with the time it takes to dry for a while now perhaps its been on the way out for a while now. it would appearently take sometimes 3 orore cycles to dry. Turns out the part is not very expensive and looks fairly easy to install. I might just go ahead and order all 3 parts, the thermostat and the fuse.

http://www.amazon.com/8565582-WHIRLP.../dp/B00I3K15O4

If anyone has any suggestions still I am open to them.
 
  #36  
Old 12-31-15, 12:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ordered new thermostat, fuse and element, dryer works now! Waiting for the wifes input on if these changes make the dryer better or not.

Back to the original reason of this post. So i have the 3inch pvc pipe i need to attach it to a 4inch diameter is there some attachment easily available? Can i be sure its 3 inches without actually measuring I was hoping to stop on the way home.
 
  #37  
Old 01-13-16, 06:29 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well dryer wont start again. Bought a multimeter to see what it is. Wondering if one of the new parts I added broke. If the start button is pushed down now it wont even tumble humm or anything.

Not sure how to use a multimeter so this might get interesting!
 
  #38  
Old 01-13-16, 11:49 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,296
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Best place to start is at the breaker box, considering that you apparently have zero power right now.

We can guide you in the use of a meter. If you already have one - fine. If not, a digital is easier to read but often gives false or ghost readings. An analog is a little harder to read at first but may be more accurate.
 
  #39  
Old 01-18-16, 07:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 99
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you goldstar!

Bought the #1 rated multeter on Amazon and it came in last night. Took apart the back again and everything had a current or however you would say it. Then I checked the door switch, BINGO! I had already ordered spar thermofuses belt thermostats all of those and a door switch. It however has not arrived yet in the meantime i just cit the wire on the door switch and put a wire cap on the end (thank you youtube). When the part arrives i will fix that as well. I am also considering this other semi metal for the dryer exhasut not only safer but i feel i can get the dryer back further
 
  #40  
Old 01-18-16, 08:08 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,407
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Before putting dryer back feel air flow from exhaust with vent tube off. Reconnect vent and go outside and feel air flow, Should be about the same. If less you need to either clean vent to outside or replace it to 4 inch. resisted air flow is number 1 reason for dryer problems and long dry times,
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: