need to vent cinder block garage


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Old 05-03-16, 02:11 PM
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need to vent cinder block garage

I have an all cinder block garage with a metal roof in which I park my classic car. The chrome wheels on the car have rusted badly over the years and I have purchased some new ones. Before I put on the new wheels I want to figure out why they are rusting. The garage has no vents or windows except the ones in the doors. Iíve been told the moisture is coming up from the concrete slab floor. There isnít a moister barrier under the slab. I was thinking that having a vent on each gable would help circulate the air. I was thinking maybe a foundation vent on each end would do the trick. Can I cut out the block for the vents without worrying about weakening the structure? Any other ideas about how to vent the space would also be appreciated. I have attached a phot of the front of the garage.Name:  garage.jpg
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Old 05-03-16, 03:39 PM
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It's rusting because it gets condensation on it on a daily basis... just like the grass gets dew on it almost daily. Ventilation alone is not going to completely solve the problem, because the condensation is being caused by the temperature inside the shed at night and in the early morning. Its probably staying cool inside the garage while the dew point outside is rising above the temperature inside the garage. As the air mixes, it's going to condense on the car until such a time that the car temperature is above the dewpoint. The wheels are affected the most because it's colder on the floor than it is up high. The upper part of the garage heats up first as the sun hits it... while the wheels are still cold.

If you want to try adding ventilation, it won't hurt anything. If you want to go that route, I would suggest a few louvered vents, like Lomanco 200's in the wall between studs, but not in the foundation. And then a few roof vents, like Lomanco 750's. If you want a gable vent, Lomanco 900's adjust to fit the roof pitch. But I think you would probably like it if you could avoid cutting through any studs to do this.
 
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Old 05-03-16, 04:09 PM
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I have the same problem in my hangar. Sometimes it's so bad it rains from the ceiling but usually it just causes condensation on everything which rapidly rusts unprotected steel. Ventilation helps a bit but under some circumstances it makes the problem worse by allowing warm humid air inside. The best solution I've found is insulation. You need to minimize the temperature swings or at least slow down the rate of change inside the garage to avoid condensation.
 
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Old 05-03-16, 04:11 PM
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Any power in the garage? Of so just add a dehumidfier and have the drain run out the wall.
To vent that style garage you would have add snap in round vents to the wood blocking soffits and remove that roof cap that's there now and add a vented ridge cap.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 08:56 AM
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Thanks for the replies. I should have added a bit more detail about the building. It is all cinder block, no studs, no insulation. I mentioned foundation vents because I though they would be the easiest to install in the cinder block gable ends. I do have power and thought about a dehumidifier but worry about something running in a building pretty far from the house. And I guess there would be a problem with freezing in the winter.

The car has chrome bumpers which do not rust which makes the comment about the wheels being closer to the ground make more sense. I was thinking about putting down rubber mats in the area where the tires end up when parked to help insulate the tires form the slab. The garage is 10 x 20 so it is a tight fit and the tires end up pretty much in the same place whenever the car is in there.
 
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Old 05-04-16, 09:15 AM
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Pads under the tires won't help with the rims rusting.

Have you tried polishing the rims. Is it actually the rims rusting or is is steel/iron particles on top of the chrome that are rusting. I have seen steel particulate from brakes stick to rims and rust. Once it rusts a bit it sticks surprisingly well but a good polishing can remove it. If it's actually the rims rusting it's likely a difference in the plating quality why your rims rust while other chrome parts of the car don't.
 
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Old 05-06-16, 11:41 AM
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It is actually the rims, my car had drum brakes so I doubt if any brake dust is getting to the rims.
I found this device online that sound good and looks like it could do the job it costs 199.00 but I think I could replicate it myself for a lot less using a duct fan and a humidistat.

Wizzvent - Garage Ventilator For Humidity Control
 
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Old 05-06-16, 01:30 PM
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That Wizzvent is nothing more than a ventilation fan controlled by a humidistat. It will do very little to solve your problem, if it does anything at all beyond burning up electricity.
 
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Old 05-06-16, 02:02 PM
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I would probably put a big fan up in the "attic" that blows air downward at the car. Simply moving the air will help eliminate condensation. Plus air in the peak of the roof will be warmer as the sun warms the roof, so that fan will reduce the amount of time the car spends below the dewpoint by warming it up faster.

This really isn't a humidity problem... it's a temperature differential problem.
 
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Old 05-09-16, 07:26 PM
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The inside of the garage is open all the way to the roof. So the "roof" on the inside is the metal roof. There is a cross tie in the middle where I could mount a ceiling fan. Do you think that would provide enough circulation to prevent condensation?
 
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Old 05-09-16, 08:34 PM
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I don't know if it would totally prevent it, but it would certainly limit it. Moving the air is the key.
 
 

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