Need level base for garage man-door.


  #1  
Old 11-05-16, 04:20 PM
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Need level base for garage man-door.

Door currently rests on outside edge concrete. Need to either cut those sections out, or put something under the door.

The parts it currently rests on are almost level. The garage floor is much further from level. So if I go the cut method and lower to garage floor, I'll need to find a way to level the floor too.

If I put concrete in there, it will only be an inch thick, and it seems concrete is supposed to be at least 2" thick. This is the method the original builders seem to have used if you requested the man-door during construction, but it's not really well done, you can see corners broken off or eroded off.

Any other options?

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Neighbors house:

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  #2  
Old 11-05-16, 05:03 PM
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Welcome!
You could tear out the old door and install new, but that's too much work.
Your door looks sealed on the outside and installed properly, so I would leave it alone.
It's just sitting above the floor for some reason

I would fill that gap with grout, or plastic cement would be better. Make some type of simple form and use a grout bag to inject the grout and ensure the gap is fully filled to support the threshold.
 
  #3  
Old 11-06-16, 06:12 AM
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I'll tell you how I've had to do it many times working on 100 plus year old houses where nothing is ever level flat or plumb.
To do this right the door needs to come out, trying to just inject anything under the threshold is going to leave a lot of voids.
Once the door is out I cleaned off the concrete and made sure there was no loose material..
I ripped a tapered strip of 1X that gets attached to the slab that acts as a form on the inside ( in your case I'd want it about 1/2" higher then the stem walls on the side of the door).
On the outside I Tap Coned a piece of 1 X 3 making sure it's level with the inside strip.
The first time I did this I was an hour away from a store and all I had on the truck was Hydraulic Cement so I used it.
You had to work fast because it hardens so quick, but it work, and has been in place for at least 5 years.
Now I use Topping mix.
Once hardened, forms removed and the doors back in (with the threshold set in a bed of silicone) you add a piece of 1 X 4 PVC lumber flat to the outside of the slab tight up against the bottom side of the slab to support the over hang.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 07:17 AM
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I agree with Joe's fix. Having a level threshold before installing an exterior door makes the door easier to plumb and level, plus makes weatherproofing easier as mentioned.
 
  #5  
Old 11-07-16, 02:02 PM
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Thank you Handyone, but my label of the neighbors door may not have been clear. The door with a giant gap is my door. It is not (fully) installed yet. There has never been a door there (except the one currently half-installed with a gap under it). The one with the concrete under it is my neighbors door (house built by same builder as mine, so it is how they _would_ have put in my door if I asked for one).
 

Last edited by Josh Alto; 11-07-16 at 02:38 PM. Reason: clairfication
  #6  
Old 11-07-16, 02:09 PM
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Thank you Joe, I think that is the way I'll have to go. I'd rather avoid the "tap con" part though. So maybe a longer piece that I can then metal-steak into the dirt to the sides of the exterior concrete pad?

My concern is all concrete I've found says it needs to be at least 2" thick. This will be about 1" thick.

Also, do you think I should caulk the form-to-concrete corners to prevent seepage under the forms? Not done much concrete work before. I've only ever filled one hole.

I figure I'll also use an acrylic fortifier/bonder brushed on to promote adhesion old-new. And maybe do the runny-concrete-mix wash first, then do the poor. Not sure if the acrylic liquid is an either/or on the runny wash method but I'll look into it.

Also, any reinforcement recommended? Like fiberglass or hardware cloth or something?
 
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Old 11-07-16, 02:33 PM
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I get it now. I thought the door was already installed and you didn't want to remove it.
You're starting fresh and that's good. Just follow Joe's instructions.
The form doesn't need to be super strong so just secure it anyway you can temporarily.
Prep wouldn't hurt, but what you're after is a nice clean and level 'curb' or block of plastic cement under the door. 1" is fine. 2" minimum probably refers to if you're laying it on sand or something.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 02:33 PM
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Actually it looks like your recommended "Topping mix" is for thicknesses of around 1". So that's perfect.

Also it says to either use a bonder for 1"-2", or to put acrylic fortifier into the mix for 1" or less.

Lastly, I suppose I should cover stud-to-stud, and not just the gap between the stem walls, right? Since I probably don't want the verticals hanging in the air and all the weight (until affixed to studs) just resting on threshold. Maybe I should cut out the stem walls so they're flush with the studs, and THEN poor this overlay, so it's consistent across the whole thing? Or do you think just covering these a little bit (1/4") should be fine?

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Last edited by Josh Alto; 11-07-16 at 02:37 PM. Reason: added image
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Old 11-07-16, 02:48 PM
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Last point/question. Sorry this helps me brainstorm even if you guys don't answer. But thanks if you do. :-)

You recommend 1/2" higher than stem wall. What is the reason for this? I only have (just under) 1/4" on right side I can go higher than that stem wall before I have to adjust stud framing. The header is much higher, but there are vertical 2x4s and a horizontal 2x4 spacing it down to near the top of the door. There is also a main panel grounding cable that runs through these (moved by an actual electrician, they originally went right through where the door is going). So taking them out and rigging something else won't be super easy. I'd like to avoid it if possible.

Would going to just a hair (1/8" max) over the right stem wall be sufficient? Or just going to the top of it even?

Thanks,
Josh
 
  #10  
Old 11-08-16, 06:51 AM
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Are you sure you even want a threshold on a garage man door? My garage has a row of block with the door between going right to the floor with a rubber adjustable sweep on the bottom.

Much nicer to wheel or drive something through the door or sweeping some rain/snow out the door.

I don't know, maybe I built mine wrong.
 
  #11  
Old 11-08-16, 01:57 PM
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That's actually a decent question to ask. I think in some applications that might work much better for reasons like you describe.

I think for mine it's better to have a weather-proof lip there though. We get a lot of snow, and when it melts I don't want water penetrating into the garage. We even made sure to have the door open _inward_ so that when it snows we will be sure to be able to open the door before it's shoveled. I also have wood standing cabinets that will be inches from the door.
 
  #12  
Old 11-18-16, 04:03 PM
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I ground down the concrete the door was sitting on so I could get it lower and all level. I'm preparing to make my forms, but I just realized there are expansion joints. Do I need to extend those up? Or do something else? Help!

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  #13  
Old 11-18-16, 04:10 PM
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Some reading indicates I need to honor the existing expansion joints and extend them up. The advice seems to say I need to cut the concrete once cured to get back down to them though. Can't I just stick the tiny cut joint material in there before I poor the concrete? Some may get between old and new joint, but it'd be really thin and if that stuff cracks that's fine, right?

So just cut some pieces and hold them in place over old joints while I poor? Then let weight of concrete hold in place.
 
 

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