Retaining wall questions


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Old 02-15-17, 02:07 PM
K
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Retaining wall questions

I currently have a side yard that isn't being utilized and that is also sloped and would like to put in a Diamond pro block retaining wall and incorporate it into my back yard. My question is that there are two concrete slabs poured for access and I'm not sure if it will create any kind of problem with the soil adhering to it and creating pressure on the wall? As far as I have read as long as I have a good base, gravel drainage, French drain and some fabric down I should be good to go but I cant find anything online pertaining to this particular topic. This is a link to my side yard because im sure a picture is worth more than my words https://photos.zillowstatic.com/p_f/...1000000000.jpg

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 02-15-17, 02:31 PM
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Welcome to the forums. Can you provide some pictures that demonstrate the need for the wall?
 
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Old 02-15-17, 02:44 PM
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If you open the link you will see the yard and cement slabs. The retaining wall will basically be as high as the short chain link fence.
 
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Old 02-15-17, 03:14 PM
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You are thinking of running the retaining wall all along the driveway, then along the walkway and opposite side with the aim being to raise then entire area up to be level with the grade at the house?

And you would just bury the slabs under soil?
 
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Old 02-16-17, 07:09 AM
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I did open the link before I responded. I have no idea what you're trying to accomplish as your picture did not show me any need for a wall.
 
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Old 02-16-17, 08:34 AM
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CarbideTipped hit it on the head. ill be running the wall from the driveway turning along the sidewalk then turning back up the slope towards the white fence in the foreground. sorry about my incompetence of explanation...
 
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Old 02-16-17, 08:58 AM
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Got it. So the wall looks like it will be about 3 feet tall where it runs along the sidewalk. I think you can do it as you describe, I would install some deadmen (google retaining wall deadman) along the front run to help the wall resist bowing out.

I don't think the slabs will be a huge deal....the slope is not that great, but it would be easy enough to remove the lower sections with the heavy equipment you will need to place the soil. And you will need a *lot* of soil! I would place and compact as much of the soil as you can before building the wall as you don't want heavy equipment moving around up there putting pressure on the wall afterwards.

With a three foot drop off you are going to need a fence along that edge for safety.
 
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Old 02-16-17, 02:43 PM
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Definitely going to be putting a fence up around the perimeter. I'm familiar with the concept and reasoning behind dead man but im using the inner locking concrete retaining wall blocks so I'm not sure there is a way to install a dead man that way? Yeah it going to be a lot of fill dirt behind the wall and luckily I have access to reasonable priced dirt and a free bobcat! but good idea with putting as much dirt in as possible first! I was going to construct most of the wall then leave a gap wide enough to drive the bobcat in. But staking the dirt is good thinking as there is no exit on the other side of the white fence!
 
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Old 02-16-17, 04:43 PM
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klofdahl -

The installation of "deadmen" is not advised.

The type of segmental retaining wall units (officially SRWs) that you referred to does not require or allow the use of dead men. I believe I saw some of the first retaining wall units made and I think those that were made in our plant. (We made about 4 or 5 different systems)

With the geogrid the wall heights can be as high as 15'. - In Spain saw a series of retaining walls and geogrid that varied up to 15' high that had multiple wall sections along about 10 miles of highway and some areas used walls tiered and stepped back to create a retaining wall system that was up to 50' high.

For your type and height of wall, you have the exact type of wall you propose (without dead men) that is suggested by all of the various retaining wall suppliers. Usually the maximum height of the wall for the system is either 4' or 5' without any additional complications or lateral supporting restraints. Beyond the 4' or 5' height the ideal method is to use "geogrid" (synthetic web reinforcing layers in the soil as it is backfilled).

I would forget about the dead men since it is not compatible with the development of the system.

Dick
 
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Old 02-19-17, 12:38 AM
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Cement (aka Portland cement) is a fluffy gray powder, that by itself has no structural strength. When combined with water and aggregates, it forms concrete.
 
 

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