Foundation Wall Crack Repair - Basement Interior

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-06-17, 03:56 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Foundation Wall Crack Repair - Basement Interior

Iím renovating a basement bathroom and recently took down the exterior wall which was drywall and tile against furring strips. I found a significant crack in the wall which extends from the base of the basement window to the floor. The crack is deep in some areas and also wide in other areas. We have had significant rain over the past week, but I do not see any indication of water (and it was raining and the ground was saturated as I removed the wall). However, some of the furring strips were rotted below the crack Ė the furring strips were probably there since 1965 though and looked to be untreated. This particular basement window is also under an over-hand which Iím certain helps to protect it from water.

With regards to repairing the crack, I know that I could trowel in hydraulic cement, especially where the crack is wide, but it would probably not get very deep. Does anyone recommend the foundation crack kits ? I saw a number of epoxy systems that look as though they can penetrate pretty deep into the crack. I would be interested in hearing any suggestions recommendations on how best to deal with this. Iím attaching a couple pictures.

Thanks in advance !
 
Attached Images   
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-06-17, 05:52 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,536
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
I've had a couple of basements (poured concrete) that developed cracks, small to moderate, and in every case the builder, or myself, used the same repair company that used injected epoxy.

Only one time did the water not stop but they came out and fixed.

It's a proven system!
 
  #3  
Old 04-06-17, 05:55 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you Marq1 - I appreciate your help (again). Do you happen to recall the epoxy injection system that you used? I noticed there are a lot of them out there, not sure if one is better than the others.
 
  #4  
Old 04-08-17, 12:15 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I've been away from the industry too many years to make brand-name recommendations. Although sticking with a well-known product line, such as Sika or Adhesive Engineering, is likely to bring better results. And remember to use a low-modulus epoxy instead of high-modulus, as the former has an inherent amount of "give" as opposed to being brittle.
 
  #5  
Old 04-08-17, 02:18 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,536
Received 367 Votes on 342 Posts
In our case it was a company that came out and used a pump to inject the urethane into the wall vs a DIY kit.
 
  #6  
Old 04-08-17, 05:30 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I did investigate the epoxy injection systems and I had a few people warn that because of the size of the crack, there was a good possibility that the epoxy might leak out. I purchased a masonry epoxy from PC Products but have not received it yet. It was purchased prior to reading Bridgeman's recommendation for a low-modulus epoxy, and i have confirmed that it is a high-modulus epoxy. I was not aware of the difference until I read the comment and started doing some reading. Since the foundation is over 50 years old; would that reduce the likelihood of further settling ? It sounds as though the primary reason for using the low-modulus epoxy is to have some elasticity in the event of movement or settling

Thanks again everyone
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: