Footing Location


  #41  
Old 08-23-17, 03:27 PM
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Just got home and they poured concrete today. Evidently their solution was to pour new footings on top or and beside the existing ones, not underneath. Supposedly an engineer came up with this solution. A little suspicious, but I'm no expert.
 
  #42  
Old 08-23-17, 08:56 PM
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I took a closer look this evening, and for half of the areas, they poured new footings next to the existing ones. I'm hoping they drilled horizontal rebar every 12" orthogonal to the old footings and parallel as well, but there is no way to tell. For the other half, they poured another 6" thick footing on top of the existing footing and made it wider. For some reason, this area was not troweled smooth. It was left rough and lumpy. No flipping clue why they did this.
 
  #43  
Old 08-24-17, 05:39 PM
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I doubt they drilled rebar into the side of the old footing because they didn't dig far back enough for a drill to fit down there. I swear these guys. Maybe I should demand some sort of extended warranty against any foundation issues. For as long as I own the home sounds fair.
 
  #44  
Old 08-25-17, 09:36 AM
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This is a cross section of what they did for one 20' length run. The other sections (four), they poured a new footing next to the original one and flush with the top. Whether or not they used horizontal rebar to pin new to original is questionable.
 
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  #45  
Old 08-26-17, 11:42 AM
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Did they actually have an engineer come up with that solution? If they did and he should be able to provide you with signed and stamped documentation that this is a acceptable solution. If it's something they did on their own I wouldn't accept it.
 
  #46  
Old 08-27-17, 06:05 PM
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I insisted an engineer was to he involved, they agreed, and when I asked they said they were waiting to hear back. That same day I came home and they had just finished pouring. Kicking myself for working late that day. I did find out today that apparently they didn't dig down to the base of the existing footing like I showed in my drawing. I drove a piece of rebar under that area and it kept going. So they poured an 8 inch shelf of concrete on top of the original footing. How on earth that is going to help is beyond me. Seems like it just added a bunch of weight and is now going to act like a lever and apply even more rotational force to the original footing. I asked for the engineer approved drawings last Friday and didn't get a reply. The PM is coming out tomorrow to discuss the path forward. Kind of worried actually. I'm seriously considering having then backfill everything, repairing my porch, and planting sod so I can have me home and my sanity back.
 
  #47  
Old 08-28-17, 09:25 AM
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This is what they actually ended up doing for one 25' section:
 
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  #48  
Old 08-28-17, 01:14 PM
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Interesting. That new "footing" is now acting like a cantilevered beam if the soil beside the existing footing is not adequately compacted, pinned in place by the vertical bars. I hope there's some top steel in that new footing running the width of the footing. Additionally, if it's not adequately compacted, that existing footing is subject to rotation. Keep after that contractor with "Where's the engineer?". If it were mine, I'd be talking to the contractor about stopping all work and any payments until this is resolved by a licensed engineer like he promised.

Honestly, I've seen enough failed compaction tests even with very experienced commercial dirt contractors to be concerned, especially when it's supporting footings.
 
  #49  
Old 08-28-17, 06:57 PM
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I met with the new PM and designer this evening and they said an engineer was involved. No stamped drawings, but apparently the engineer came out and oversaw pouring of the supplemental footings. They will be providing me with the engineer's report and inspection document tomorrow. Still seems fishy to me, but I trust these two. And at least there is a 10 year structural warranty written in the contract, so that helps.
 
  #50  
Old 08-29-17, 02:33 AM
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If you get the report from the engineer, I wouldn't lose any more sleep over it.
 
  #51  
Old 08-29-17, 06:36 AM
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I'll be sure to get the report. Now on to the next issue--they had to excavate a 10' x 10' x 8' deep area for the footings in the rear of the addition because the soil was unstable and collapsed into the trenches (because things have been delayed). Now there's a huge hole that needs to be backfilled, and apparently the engineer has to be involved with this as well because a slab will be in this area (mudroom will have PT sleepers over a slab). I believe the reason is because the slab will be applying additional downward pressure against the soil and therefore against the existing basement wall. I mentioned why not just do a crawlspace, but they didn't seem to think that was a good idea for whatever reason. There are two main reasons I don't want a crawlspace. One is air infiltration through the foundation vent and a potentially cold floor in the winter, and the other is the fact that an 18" x 24" door is required on the exterior for access. I'll be building a deck off the backside, which will cover the door and I imagine there has to be someway to get to it. I'd hate for a stupid door to affect my deck layout/design.
 
 

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