Driveway rainwater drainage

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Old 09-28-17, 06:48 PM
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Driveway rainwater drainage

Hi, I own a large property with a sloped asphalt driveway. The rainwater run-off is causing structural damage to an old brick barn toward the bottom of the drive. There is about a six foot gap between the edge of the pavement and the barn that is just sandy soil. My question is whether I should install a catch basin in the soil in front of the barn and cut a six inch trench through the existing asphalt for drain pipe to extend further down away from the barn OR can I fix this simpler and add an asphalt hump along the edge of the pavement to keep the rainwater from running off the edge and the rainwater would then pass by the front of the barn. Another question, can fresh asphalt like a 4"hump be attached to older asphalt and water wouldn't pass through it? The pitch to the driveway is a reasonable grade and the amount of square footage allowing water run-off is significant so I don't know the best way to go. If I did install a catch basin, what diameter box do you estimate would be needed and the best place to stick it would be dead center of the front of the barn? Photos attached. Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 09-29-17, 02:15 AM
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Curbing might help. If you lay down some 4x4s along the edge where you want the curbing [hump] and check it out during/after a good rain it would give you an idea of how effective it would be.
 
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Old 09-29-17, 11:53 AM
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I'd second trying out the curb route. Catch basins can move a lot of water but only if the grate isn't clogged with leaves and such.
 
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Old 09-29-17, 04:54 PM
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If that is the edge of the drive I'd consider a curb along the edge of the drive which would allow the dirt to be raised in front of the garage.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 02:43 PM
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I have decided to make a 4"asphalt hump along the edge of the existing pavement to divert the rainwater. My question now is, can I simply attach a hump of fresh asphalt to the existing pavement? Should I use hot tar or something to help as an adhesive under the new asphalt? Do they sell something like that in retail stores and is there an easy way to heat it, or would a cold liquid tar product work that same?
 
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Old 10-03-17, 04:01 PM
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Have you considered putting a concrete curb just off the edge of the asphalt?
 
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Old 10-03-17, 04:27 PM
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I think putting in a concrete curb would be more work and more costly then installing an asphalt hump. First of all, I would need at least six to eight inches of depth in concrete for a curb to be supported against snow plows, farm machinery and other vehicles. Technically I should pour a separate concrete footing first for stability. Secondly, I would still need to saw a 20' straight line through the entire edge of the existing asphalt to butt the curb up against it unless I poured the curb first and added additional asphalt to butt against it. I could hire someone to do this but I don't know what the total cost would be. I just wanted the simplest method possible to try myself and I thought diverting the water using a hump would work.
 
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Old 10-04-17, 02:37 AM
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Where would you get the asphalt to diy? The bags of cold asphalt patch don't do a great job of patching and I'd have concerns about it working for a curb. I doubt a footer would be needed for a curb. Adding rebar in the middle would make it fairly stable.
 
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Old 10-05-17, 02:48 PM
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I have an asphalt plant about 10 miles from my house, so I would buy a ton of hot asphalt mix direct and pick it up in my mason dump. I could shovel it right out of the back once I got set up. I agree that the bagged cold patch would be a terrible solution and a waste of time. Only other thing I would need would be about a 5 gallon bucket of tack coat to help the new stuff to adhere to the old stuff, but tack is sold cold so I'd have to find way to heat a 5 gallon metal pail. I think this is gonna work.
 
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Old 10-05-17, 02:56 PM
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Wouldn't hurt to round up some help when it's time to unload the hot asphalt - it won't stay hot/pliable long. 30 or so years ago they were paving a nearby highway and truck driver stopped and asked if I could use the leftover asphalt [for free] on my dirt driveway. He could only partially spread it because of a power line. By the time I got it all spread with a shovel and wheel barrow I was about sorry I accepted the several tons of free asphalt.

You could probably build a fire under the bucket ..... assuming it's a metal bucket.
 
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