Crumbling Asphalt - Repair or Replace?

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  #1  
Old 02-20-18, 03:04 PM
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Crumbling Asphalt - Repair or Replace?

There's a new asphalt patch along my gutter (approximately 12" wide by 25' long) that was placed over the winter. I was doing some sweeping and cleaning with the hose over the weekend and noticed quite a bit of aggregate coming loose. It appears that either not enough tar was used and/or it wasn't hot enough and/or it wasn't rolled sufficiently (if that's what you call it). I was not home when it was done, so I have no idea. All I know is that it is crumbling apart and I can't imagine it is going to get any better. Can this be repaired or should I ask them to replace it when the temperatures warm up? I'm curious if I can put down some seal coat to seal it up and hold everything together. It doesn't appear to be beyond repair at this point, but a couple more freeze/thaw cycles and it probably will be, so I need to do something sooner than later.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-20-18, 03:22 PM
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Have whoever laid the asphalt to come back and take up their mistake and relay new asphalt in its place. They lay asphalt in all types of temperatures, it is simply a matter of adding an additive whenever the temperature is too cold.

BTW, they may insist on repairing what's there, don't let them. Demand it be replaced.
 
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Old 02-20-18, 05:03 PM
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I'm curious if I can put down some seal coat to seal it up and hold everything together.
Asphalt is made from aggregate and a binder, a substance derived from crude oil, it's heated and layed down, there is no repair for material that is crumbling!
 
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Old 02-20-18, 06:13 PM
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Asphalt is made from aggregate and a binder, a substance derived from crude oil, it's heated and layed down, there is no repair for material that is crumbling!
Okay, that is why I asked. I was hoping there was some binder that could be poured over top that would seep down inside and bond everything together to prevent further crumbling.

I guess I don't know what is acceptable and what isn't. Here are a couple photos. If I keep hitting it with the hose, more keeps coming out.
 
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Last edited by mossman; 02-20-18 at 06:34 PM.
  #5  
Old 02-21-18, 01:15 AM
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Looks like a road?

The mixture used for a residential drive way is different than what is used on a public roadway, much heavier aggregate. But if that is a road, it may be normal?
 
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Old 02-21-18, 03:41 AM
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If that is the city/county road - I'm not sure I'd worry about it much although if a private company did the asphalt patch I'd expect they'd have to do it to gov't specs. Normally asphalt has to age a yr before sealer is applied on driveway - don't know if any thing changes with road asphalt.
 
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Old 02-21-18, 04:31 AM
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Around here, any work done in the public street has to be done according to the specs of the governing authority who owns the street. I would suggest calling whatever agency owns the street and ask them. They will be able to tell you if it's right.
 
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Old 02-21-18, 04:50 AM
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Just complaining about the bad job won't get it fixed.

You need to give cause to get them to respond.

If you want it fixed call the local highway authorities for your area and complain that the crumbling aggregate is causing harm to your car and is being tracked into the house. Also people walking along the area are tripping due to the stone being spread along drive and adjacent sidewalk. I'll bet it's repaired almost immediately.
 
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Old 02-21-18, 05:13 AM
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Correct, it is a patch on a public road along my gutter, which is also new (the patch ends just to the left of the photo). I had to get a permit for through VDOT. They approved it the day after it was completed, but it has been deteriorating. It was done by a private contractor hired by my builder. I already spoke with the county and they said if they come inspect it and it is unacceptable, then they hold the permit holder (me) responsible. I haven't paid the builder for the patch yet, so I have some leverage. I guess I should get VDOT back out to tell me if it needs to be fixed.
 
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Old 02-21-18, 07:29 AM
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Around here, any work done in the public street has to be done according to the specs of the governing authority who owns the street. I would suggest calling whatever agency owns the street and ask them. They will be able to tell you if it's right.
VDOT is coming out tomorrow morning to assess.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 09:06 AM
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VDOT agreed the patch is sub-par and isn't going to last. They said they can send me an official letter stating how it wasn't done properly and that it needs to be replaced. Aside from that, the responsibility of getting it fixed still falls on me, the permit holder, but hopefully showing this letter to the builder will encourage them to get it fixed.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 09:46 AM
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If the builder hem haws around and you expect he might not fix it - get bids from pavers so you'll know how much to withhold from his final check, if need be.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 10:27 AM
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get bids from pavers so you'll know how much to withhold from his final check, if need be.
.

Good idea. I'll be sure to do that!
 
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Old 02-22-18, 10:33 AM
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Might also be a good idea no matter who does the repair have VDOT sign off on it prior to payment.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 10:53 AM
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VDOT did sign off on it, because it looked fine the day after. After some ice, snow, freezing, it has become apparent that it isn't going to hold up.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 11:33 AM
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On the chance that your contractor doesn't fix it, I would start getting everything in writing to him. Include the letter from VDOT and send it Certified Mail where he has to sign for the letter. When I was working, we had a saying: "If it ain't in writing, it don't count". And copy VDOT on your letter, with a cc. at the bottom so your contractor knows you're copying VDOT.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 11:41 AM
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Thanks for the advice fellas!
 
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Old 02-24-18, 06:00 AM
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1st guess is cold hot mix,,, 2nd guess is the same,,, imo, can't be saved
 
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