Solid or hollow block for shed walls

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  #1  
Old 08-02-18, 05:20 AM
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Solid or hollow block for shed walls

Moved the spa this week and the old pad which was used for the swim spa is now going to be used to build a 10x18 bar/tiki hut/whatever shed.

From fellow shed builder it was advised to lay down a course of block on the slab to get the walls up so when trimming grass the siding will not get damaged.

Plan is to use 4x6 block,

Is there an advantage of using hollow or solid block?

Either way some type of anchor will be needed so one benefit of hollow is less drilling!
 
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Old 08-02-18, 05:53 AM
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I would be tempted to use hollow block. Build my walls above with steel anchors going down into the voids in the block. Then fill the voids with concrete to lock the anchors and walls in place.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 05:56 AM
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IMO it's easier to secure the hollow block because the mortar will also go into the voids some. I've always installed the anchosr like PD does.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 07:29 AM
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Use hollow block, and slug the holes that will receive your j bolts... set them in your wet concrete so that your bottom plate can be bolted to them. Leave them protrude at least 2 1/4". You want them no more than 12" from each corner or doorway and about 4' apart along the walls. And no more than 12" from any plate splice.

Some inspectors would want rebar protruding from the pad into the block too.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 08:37 AM
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Some inspectors would want rebar protruding from the pad into the block too.

Again, this is an existing bad being reused for the shed, Anchors will have to go down thru the block and into the pad.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 12:14 PM
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Let me spell it out better. You drill holes in the pad and pound short pieces or reb2ar down. down. Then mortar the blocks in over the top. It helps resist lateral movement.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 12:37 PM
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Apparently they do not carry/make a 4x6 hollow block, only a 4x8 so considering the pad is above ground level already I didnt want 10" of block showing below the siding so more drilling required.
 
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Old 08-02-18, 02:10 PM
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Unless your walls are going to be 2x6, 4x4x16 is a common size.
 
  #9  
Old 08-04-18, 04:24 AM
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I'm just throwing this out there. If you don't care about the size of the shed, you could back the walls 2-3" away from the edge of the pad. The "buffer" will allow you to mow/weed-wack up to the pad, without touching the siding.

Just drill holes in the pad for expanding concrete anchors and bolt down a pressure treated footer. It's less work, the only downside is you'll have a slightly smaller shed.
 
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Old 08-04-18, 05:01 AM
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IMO it's still best to raise the foundation walls in order to keep it above and setting rain water and snow. It's also easier to keep the inside dry that way.
 
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Old 08-04-18, 09:46 AM
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I agree, I want to max the size and I now have 4x6 solids. so will just need to get that longer drill bit!!
 
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Old 08-04-18, 11:18 AM
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think it would of been easier to just pour a foundation and not use block at all.
 
  #13  
Old 09-17-18, 06:21 AM
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So just to refresh, this is an existing slab, I have the 4x6x16 solid blocks so next step is to drill holes through the block and slab for anchors.

So from what I am reading, need two anchors per corner and then one on other side of side door, so 8 holes.

Figure 3/4" holes with 5/8" or 1/2" anchors, 6" of block, 1 1/2" of sill plate, 1" of thread, min of 2 1/2" engagement makes for a 12" expansion anchor.

Wondering if just drilling through the slab and using threaded rod is an option, would not take much to dig down and get below the slab for nuts and washers?

Also, thought that the hollow blocks that were available (4x8) could be trimmed down to 6" very easily and would save a lot of drilling!

Will check out availability of hammer drill as it appears that much drilling is not feasible with conventional drill!
 
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