Concrete slab 12x24

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  #1  
Old 10-02-18, 06:16 PM
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Concrete slab 12x24

I'm planning the first of many concrete projects on my 1 acre of sand.

My plan for this first project is to test my mixer, water amount, and type of concrete on a small 2x2x4 pad to dial in what will work. our temps are now in the 88F to 90F range and approximately 80% humidity in the morning to 60% by afternoon.

The goal is to take what I learn here and apply it to a workable scale with sections on this slab for a shed that is an estimated 6000lbs.

The problem;

1) I can't get a truck the 150' it will take to be able to have pre-mix, it will sink, they won't do it.

2) I can't afford the pump truck that will cost more than the concrete, I won't do it.

3) I can't legally hire labor when I am the owner/ contractor by exemption.

That leaves me with myself and my son (young adult). I'm considering either Sakrete or Quikrete. By their calculators it comes to 160, 80lb bags plus 10% to 180, 80 lb bags. This comes out to approximately $650 in material other than the forms and rebar.

If I mix my own I can save more but the premix bags will take some of the work out of the job and that's worth it to me. The mixer will mix 2 80lb bags at a time on site, and take approximately 2 minutes to mix, (I still need to verify this).

Does anyone have experience working with these products that can give some tips on a 2 man manageable section at a time (6x6, 6x10, etc) and time for set with these temps. I'm not concerned about the time it will take over an all at once pour, just a reasonable end result, it's going under a shed.

Or alternate ideas?
 
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Old 10-02-18, 06:42 PM
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You will want to divide the slabs into equal sections for control joints and appearance, so I would recommend doing it in 6x6 sections. I would think you could easily pour a 6x6 section using bags. I would, however, suggest maybe installing rebar between each slab to tie each section together, especially if you are in a freezing location.

When I have poured footings I would figure out how many bags fit in the mixer (normally 2 or 3) and then use a 5 gal bucket and mark how much water you need to fill the bucket to get the consistency you want for the mix. Then it just gets to be dump your bags, dump in the water from the bucket, let it mix a bit and dump it in the form.

Be sure to wet the ground good so that it doesn't suck the moisture from the mix too fast.

Other options: there might be a ready mix place that has smaller trucks. I recalled on one job they sent a truck that only could do 2-3 yards.
 
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Old 10-03-18, 05:33 AM
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3) I can't legally hire labor when I am the owner/ contractor by exemption.
That doesn't make any sense, I've hired many contractors and am the owner of my property!

All I can say is pouring a slab is a hell of a lot of work! All that cement your buying has to get to the site (which works out to 14,400#'s) and you have to be able to mix fast enough to keep the pour moving along.

Cement contractors have buggys that they use to get from the street to the site, no problem with that!
 
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Old 10-10-18, 12:47 PM
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Yes, I can hire a licensed contractor. What I said was labor. The laws here (if you are a person that believes the law to be general guidelines than I guess it would not matter) require all contractors and work be licensed.

"which works out to 14,400#'s"

If the truck weighs approximately 26,000lbs and the concrete is 14,400lbs, that's actually 40,400lbs on sand with a load bearing max rated at 2000psi when properly compressed, I'm guessing that may have something to do with the refusal to drive on the sand, and requiring a pump truck.

In either case I only have what I have to work with, and I can't force someone to drive a concrete truck on beach sand. Although, I am now the proud owner of 2 dump truck loads of dirt, it's a bit of a luxury.

Hard work is not a part of the equation, except to think, plan, mitigate, and execute well. I tend to demonstrate what can be done. My new drain field (that me and my 2 boys replaced over a period of 2 months) received compliments from inspectors, and contractors in my neighborhood, testify to this. (there were plenty of critics when I started it too, it was fun proving them wrong)
 
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Old 10-10-18, 01:13 PM
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I sincerely thank you Tolyn for taking the time to answer. I wasn't sure if I put enough information in my post. The 6x6 section does seem very manageable. I don't have frost concerns here.

What do you think of laying the rebar pre pour through oversized holes in the form boards? Or should I just drill the holes post pour and anchor?

The 5 gallon bucket idea sounds simple enough, good idea, that's the kind of thing I want worked out with the practice slab so that it's dialed in with the actual project.

I also had an idea to have on hand a piece of 10" or 12" pvc drain pipe that I cut to say 4' and cut in half along it's length for a chute? what do you think, helpful? More trouble than it's worth?

I do have a Garden Tractor with a bucket that I'm considering a way to organize so I use it's muscle to lift, It's still just being entertained though.
 
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Old 10-10-18, 03:23 PM
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Concrete buggy, brings the concrete from the street to the site!

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/a...1&d=1539206630
 
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Old 10-10-18, 04:12 PM
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I would just put a wheelbarrow (or power buggy) by the mixer, dump the mix into the wheelbarrow and then wheel it to the slab form and dump it in.

You could drill the forms where you want to put 1/2" rebar between each slab, it just might be tough to get the form off the rebar after the concrete is hard.
 
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